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#1073 - 10/13/07 11:57 PM Horror Books
Samuel Hain Offline
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Registered: 10/06/07
Posts: 62
Loc: arkansas
Almost always ,books are better than the movies they are made into. What is your favorite horror book? Personally, I like the vampire novels of Nancy A.Collins. I find her much better than Anne Rice.The main vampire in the novels of Nancy Collins is one Sonja Blue, a vampire and vampire slayer. You see, she was raped during her transformation and is a dark punk/Gothic version of Buffy,without all the zany plot lines.
I also like the Dark Side novels by Simon Green in which a detective, being half demonic and the son of Lillith,can accesses a hidden side of hell where it is always 3 AM and a neutral ground between Angels, demons, and all creatures in between.


Edited by Samuel Hain (10/13/07 11:59 PM)
Edit Reason: correct topic

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#1078 - 10/14/07 03:59 AM Re: Horror Books [Re: Samuel Hain]
Woland Moderator Offline
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Registered: 08/28/07
Posts: 764
Loc: Oslo, Norway
"The Other Side" by Alfred Kubin.

"The Castle" by Frantz Kafka.

"Books of Blood" by Clive Barker.

To mention a few...
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#1082 - 10/14/07 10:41 AM Re: Horror Books [Re: Woland]
Samuel Hain Offline
pledge


Registered: 10/06/07
Posts: 62
Loc: arkansas
Ive been dealing with fiction but the book The Haunted by Robert Curran is the best book on a Haunting I have ever read.
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#1119 - 10/16/07 07:37 PM Re: Horror Books [Re: Samuel Hain]
Veldrin Offline
pledge


Registered: 10/04/07
Posts: 55
Loc: Melbourne, Australia.
Perhaps slightly off track, but I never saw the vampire chronicles as a "horror" type of book. It has horror elements, but it generally focuses more on less...tangible moral and in some circumstances philosophical and theological issues.

But then, I'm not a huge fan of horror novels. Heh.

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#1124 - 10/16/07 08:35 PM Re: Horror Books [Re: Samuel Hain]
ta2zz Offline
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Registered: 08/28/07
Posts: 1552
Loc: Connecticut
Stephen King used to be a good read around the time nightshift came out… Some other King titles I remember well are Pet Cemetery, Salems Lot, Tommyknockers and Cujo… All better books than movies… King started losing the endings around his book IT and getting a bit too fem around Gerald's Game …

Koontz had a hit with Phantoms (also a better book) but his works all read a bit the same after reading a few of his books…

Clive Barkers Weaveworld and Imajica while not being true horror were great reads… I must admit my own tastes were along the lines of the Horseclans (very bloody) novels back in the day along with the original Conan novels and a good mix of fantasy and Sci-fi… Which the Horseclans was a mix of all three...

To this day I still like to lose myself in a good sci-fi the Ringworld series is always a good read / reread…

Can anyone recommend any new sci-fi writers along the lines of the greats such as Asimov, Heinlein, Clarke, and Nivan?

Hmm seems Nivan snuck out Ringworld's Children in 2004 I missed that…

Time to buy a book…

Peace

~T~
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#1143 - 10/17/07 10:23 AM Re: Horror Books [Re: ta2zz]
Draculesti Offline
Impaler
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Registered: 09/18/07
Posts: 325
Loc: Rockville, Maryland
 Quote:
Clive Barkers Weaveworld and Imajica while not being true horror were great reads…


I couldn't agree more. I haven't honestly read many of his books that are in his horror genre, and certainly nothing that veered away from his horror/fantasy genres (Sacrament, Coldheart Canyon, Galilee], etc.) By the way, they're more along the lines of children/young adult novels, but his Abarat books are very interesting as well, and they're illustrated by Barker.

I have to admit that after a while I lost interest in horror novels. I started reading more fantasy/sci-fi and classic literature, so the horror genre began to take a backseat. I can't remember the last really great horror novel I read. In a more classic vein, the works of Poe and Lovecraft are always nice. Robert R. McCammon is great, especially They Thirst (vampire novel) and Swansong (at first it reads like a rip-off of King's The Stand , but it starts to assert its own identity soon). Methinks I will have to scour the horror section at the library for new interesting reads.

 Quote:
Can anyone recommend any new sci-fi writers along the lines of the greats such as Asimov, Heinlein, Clarke, and Nivan?


Right now I'm just finishing the Hyperion series (Hyperion, Fall of Hyperion, Endymion and Rise of Endymion) by Dan Simmons. He's not exactly new (this series dates from the early through late nineties), but if you're unfamiliar with him, it's like he's new.
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#1165 - 10/18/07 03:28 AM Re: Horror Books [Re: ta2zz]
Woland Moderator Offline
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Registered: 08/28/07
Posts: 764
Loc: Oslo, Norway
 Originally Posted By: ta2zz


Can anyone recommend any new sci-fi writers along the lines of the greats such as Asimov, Heinlein, Clarke, and Nivan?


Ive been hooked on SF since I was a pup.
Started out with "The Martian Chronicles" by Ray Bradbury.
(Spent most of my childhood/youth buried in books, reality is traditionally of little interest for me...)
Quickly went through most translations (into the Scandinavian languages) of major SF works.
After emptying that barrel I developed a taste for reading English books, dictionary on my lap.
Did wonders for my English grades at school, it did.

Ive never liked Asimov, a tad to arty for me.
Heinlein and Clarke are decent.
Will have to check out Nivan though, (an obvious hole in my selfeducation).

But; my recommendations:

My absolute favourite is Samuel R. Delaney.
Especially his early works, which he wrote in his 20s.

Try Babel 17, The Einstein Intersection and maybe The Jewels of Aptor.
When it comes to his later works I also recommend Stars in My Pocket Like Grains of Sand.

Another of the greats would be Alfred Bester.

His main work is (probably) The Stars My Destination (also published as Tiger, Tiger).
His short story Fondly Fahrenheit is (IMHO) one of the best in SF history, shitting all over Mr. Asimovs "Three Laws of Robotics".

Quote:

He doesn't know which of us I am these days, but they know one truth. You must own nothing but yourself. You must make your own life, live your own life, and die your own death ... or else you will die another's.

Ahhhhhhh.....


There is also some great works coming out of Eastern Europe.

I would recommend a peak at Stanislaw Lem.

My suggestions would be Solaris and Katar, translated into English as The Chain of Chance.
His wonderful short-story Do you Exist Mr. Johns? is incredibly funny and well worth reading.

Also; The Strugatsky Brothers are well worth spending time on.
Try out their main work A Roadside Picnic.

As I look fondly at my office bookshelf I can see the complete works of Kurt Vonnegut and Philip K. Dick.
Great American authors both of them.

Also; the latest work coming out of William Gibsons disturbed mind Spook Country is a great read.

Puhhhh...
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#1182 - 10/18/07 06:16 PM Re: Horror Books [Re: Woland]
Samuel Hain Offline
pledge


Registered: 10/06/07
Posts: 62
Loc: arkansas
As regards science fiction, I like the alternative version of American history as explained in the sci-fi novels of L. Neil Smith. In his version of America a revised Articles of Confederation, and not the Constitution, was adopted at the Constitutional Convention. (In reality delegates were chosen to revise the Articles, NOT throw them out and write something new,which is what actually happened)
In his novels The Probability Broach and The American Zone the U.S. is a libertarian Confederacy,not a Federal Republic.
As regards fantasy, I like anything by Terry Brooks. He is not afraid to kill his main characters off because "and they lived happily ever after" is one of the greatest lies ever espoused.

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#1194 - 10/19/07 02:45 AM Re: Horror Books [Re: Samuel Hain]
Disabuse Offline
member


Registered: 09/19/07
Posts: 220
If you're looking for a new twist in the Vampire world, I'd recommend the Vampire Hunter D novel series. Currently up to 8 novels, with the 9th coming out early November. These novels are set in the far future, 12,090 A.D. and provide a new and strange world to walk in. I haven't been able to put the books down since I started reading them.

Written by Hideyuki Kikuchi, these novels are what spawned the famous anime. This is a story about a famed vampire hunter named D. But there are more then just vampires in the far future.

Each book has about four or five illustrations done by Yoshitaka Amano (does the cover art as well). Same artist famous for the Final Fantasy series artwork.

Vampire Hunter D, Book 1


Edited by Disabuse (10/19/07 02:46 AM)
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#1214 - 10/21/07 12:23 PM Re: Horror Books [Re: Samuel Hain]
Equilibrio Offline
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Registered: 10/21/07
Posts: 56
Loc: Missouri
A note for fans of Clive Barker...

On October 30th Clive will return to the horror genre with "Mister B. Gone".

From The author's website:

"Mister B. Gone marks the long-awaited return of Clive Barker, the great master of the macabre, to the traditional horror story. This bone-chilling novel, in which a medieval devil speaks directly to the reader, claims to be a never-before-published demonic autobiography penned in the year 1438. The sole copy was buried by an assistant from the workshop of Johannes Gutenberg, and disappeared without a trace. Until now...

A demon known as Jakabok has embedded his very self inside each word of this book, making it into a vehicle for the forces of darkness to finally conquer all things good and holy in this world."


Being a fan of Barker's horror AND fantasy, I am eagerly anticipating the arrival of this one. The concept may seem a little cheesy to some, but it has kind of made me nostalgic for the 80's when the possibility that those heavy metal records might actually summon the Devil didn't seem so ridiculous (hey, I was a kid, give me a break).


Edited by Equilibrio (10/21/07 12:24 PM)

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