Page 1 of 1 1
Topic Options
#1315 - 10/30/07 09:18 PM "Quills"
Nemesis Offline
senior member


Registered: 09/01/07
Posts: 2175
Loc: US
I recently watched the movie "Quills" (2000), and was blown away by the brilliant acting, character development, plot (speculatively based on the remaining years of the Marquis de Sade's life spent in a mental institution at Charenton), and the fabulous costumes and settings. Geoffery Rush plays the Marquis to a hilt.

The Marquis was naughty, oh so naughty.

Unfortunately, one only gets a taste of the man's true perversions he participated in before he was incarcerated. His creative outlet is reduced to writing graphic novels, which are systematically collected and put to the torch by Napoleon (to which the cheeky de Sade actually sent a copy of "Justine" to).

The man was ahead of his time, and yet he broke through so many traditional ideas about sexuality that we wouldn't be where we are today without his contributions. I'm sure he would have loved to be alive in this day and age. A Catch-22.

Has anyone else seen this film? If so, what did you think of it?
_________________________
Nothing is sacred.

Top
#1716 - 11/10/07 08:53 PM Re: "Quills" [Re: Nemesis]
Meq Offline
Banned
active member


Registered: 08/28/07
Posts: 861
I'll keep a look out for that one.

Sade was a fascinating character, in both his writing and his life...

Top
#1898 - 11/14/07 05:44 PM Re: "Quills" [Re: Nemesis]
Draculesti Offline
Impaler
member


Registered: 09/18/07
Posts: 325
Loc: Rockville, Maryland
This has got to be one of my favorite movies ever. I have always been fascinated by the Marquis de Sade. And I wholeheartedly agree that Geoffrey Rush did a wonderful job portraying him. It was this role that made him one of my favorite actors.

Grove press has some wonderful editions out of some of de Sades works (120 Days of Sodom, Ernestine, and Oxtiern all in one volume, as well as Justine, Philosophie in the Bedroom, Dialogue Between the Priest and the Dying Man, Eugenie de Franval and other writings). I highly recommend you look into them if you've even a casual interest in Sade.

 Quote:
Unfortunately, one only gets a taste of the man's true perversions he participated in before he was incarcerated. His creative outlet is reduced to writing graphic novels, which are systematically collected and put to the torch by Napoleon (to which the cheeky de Sade actually sent a copy of "Justine" to).


This is very true. Unfortunately, if the film were to give one a better idea of what perversions he enacted, the film would necessarily have to transgress the boundary of pornography. Of course, it's not that I would mind such a thing, but has anyone ever seen an artful porno? Also, for what de Sade calls the "criminal" and "murderous" passions, it would require the equivalent of a snuff film, except that sexual depravity is coulpled with torture and murder.

There is some debate whether de Sade actually participated in the activities that he wrote about in his works, or if they were just intended to be inflammatory with very little personal experience on his part. Some of the criminal passions he describes in 120 Days of Sodom are a bit far-fetched, but not completely outside the bounds of possibility.

 Quote:
The man was ahead of his time, and yet he broke through so many traditional ideas about sexuality that we wouldn't be where we are today without his contributions.


I don't know if this is absolutely true. I think that in general mankind has always had a fascination with sex and sexual depravity. For instance, the text of Carl Orff's Catulli Carmina consists of poems obsessed with sexuality, and these poems predate de Sade by several centuries at least. Of course, they didn't go to the extremes that de Sade did in some of his writings, but the point is that he was by no means completely original in his thoughts concerning sex; he was made all the more larger than life because he was of the nobility, who were supposed to stand up as an example, or at least be better than the commoner who would naturally be taken with such ideas. It is true that in today's society we are sexually more free than before; however, a great percentage of the population is still repressed. There is still a stigma associated with sexuality even now. There are still holdovers from Victorian times. As for living in this day and age, he would have enjoyed it to a certain extent, but if he really did participate in the more criminal passions, with today's forensic science and other methods of detection, it would be much harder to get away with anything like that. In that regard, I feel he might find himself a little disappointed.
_________________________
The Holy Trinity: Me, Myself, and I.

Homo Homini Lupus

Top
Page 1 of 1 1


Moderator:  Woland, TV is God, fakepropht, SkaffenAmtiskaw, Asmedious, Fist 
Hop to:

Generated in 0.016 seconds of which 0.001 seconds were spent on 16 queries. Zlib compression disabled.