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#14983 - 11/28/08 01:30 AM Friedrich Nietzsche - Antichrist
Lestat_from_lt Offline
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Registered: 06/02/08
Posts: 12
Loc: Lithuania, Ukmerge
Yesterday, I have finished Nietsze's book called "Antichrist". Sadly, it was not such satisfactory as, for example, Machiavelly's "The Prince".
In my opinion, this book was based on Buddhism philsophy - Nietsze highlighted the "perfect minded man". His utopic ideas contradicted his own "Zarathustra" at some point. But still, some of his ideas are interesting, such as - "In Christianity neither morality nor religion come into contact with reality at any point".
What are your opinions about this book and Nietsze?

P.S. I am verry sorry about my poor language. I have not mastered english perfectly, so I apologize for any gramatical and other mistakes.

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#17037 - 12/27/08 07:20 PM Re: Friedrich Nietsze - Antichrist [Re: Lestat_from_lt]
paolo sette Offline
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Registered: 12/12/08
Posts: 263
Loc: IL, USA
I haven't read 'the AntiChrist', butI did flip through a couple of his other books. All I can say is that Nietsze was a philosopher. I saw photographs of the man with his elongated mustache, and marveled at his receding hairline. I guess his works bring about contemplation in people as(I think) he was one of the writers to influence Dr. LaVey. I interpret him as an iconoclast given the society he was in, and I believe he would have made himself a full fledged Satanist because of the philosophy behind it. He was a man that questions important things.
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#21869 - 03/11/09 11:41 AM Re: Friedrich Nietzsche - Antichrist [Re: Lestat_from_lt]
KaosKrieg Offline
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Registered: 03/04/09
Posts: 30
Loc: NYC, USA
I read "The Antichrist" about 6 months ago. The section, which begins, "Under Christianity neither morality nor religion has any part of contact with actuality..." summarizes the book. It has been said that a better translation of the German would have been "The Antichristian," but "The Antichrist" title stayed and most likely appealed to publishers.

I think that Nietzche's goal was to complement Charles Darwin's (and other evolutionist philosophers), and also of German historians. He contended that Christian values were created by people who were not qualified to create such values and ideals. Also, that Christianity is a religion for the weak and unhealthy people, whose general historical effect has been to undermine the healthy qualities of the more noble cultures, as was the case with the Roman Empire.

Yet, Nietzsche had a remarkably high view of Jesus, claiming the scholars of the day failed to pay any attention to the man, Jesus, and only look to their construction, Christ.

American writer H.L. Mencken once stated that Nietzsche felt thet the ancient Greeks' religion of the heroic and classical era was superior to Christianity because it portrayed strong, heroic, smart, beautiful women and muscular men and did not attempt to demonize healthy natural desires, such as creativity.

Nietzsche also said that while it is necessary for Jews at points in their history to affect "slave morality" as an oppressed minority as a means to repel their oppressors by deceiving them while hiding their own strengths, the deception practiced by Saul of Tarsus in spreading Christianity went too far in its social destructiveness. This also created a paradox: a person who practices "slave morality" shows true inferiority if he really believes in it, but one can show strength and superiority if one uses it as sheep's clothing to disguise the stalking wolf. As Sun Tzu put it: "All war is based on deception."

You could surmise that I liked the book. I never read "The Prince," but I fully intend to track that book down.
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"Without order nothing can exist - without chaos nothing can evolve." -- Roger von Oech.

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#21873 - 03/11/09 12:46 PM Re: Friedrich Nietzsche - Antichrist [Re: KaosKrieg]
Rasha Offline
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Registered: 03/05/09
Posts: 19
I actually preferred Nietzsches works in The Will To Power. In this book he goes on to critique the origin of religion. I thought the book was a very well rounded account of his thoughts. I also believe that to have a broader understanding of Nietzsche’s writings it is important to study a bit of other philosophers such as Plato and Socrates. This will help you gain a broader perspective of where a lot of theories came from. I find that Nietzsche is often misinterpreted in many different respects.
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#22116 - 03/16/09 05:12 PM Re: Friedrich Nietzsche - Antichrist [Re: Lestat_from_lt]
Sordid Archetype Offline
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Registered: 03/05/08
Posts: 28
Loc: Long Island, NY
I have one of those Penguin series books with Twilight of the Idols and The Antichrist bound in a single publication. I read through Twilight of the Idols probably with more ferocity than I have read through any book, yet The Antichrist really didn't grab me so much. I've owned this book probably 7 years now and I still haven't managed to finish The Antichrist yet.

For the most part, I get the message: The enlightened man, the next step in evolution - and truthfully "open your fucking eyes." Personally I found the most of what I did read to be unnecessary bloat around it all. Twilight of the Idols, however, was a bit more direct and virulent. I suppose it's just more to my taste.

I would like to mention one one point though.

 Quote:
His utopic ideas contradicted his own "Zarathustra" at some point.

It's funny, because I will often hear a lot of people make statements like this, but the truth of the matter is that Nietzsche wrote both pieces at two separate, and vastly different, parts in his life. Isn't it at all possible for one to ever change their own mind? I tend to notice that most people (myself included) will often have different (if only even slightly) ideas when they are older as opposed to being younger. Experience and all that jazz you know. Yet if one is to write down his thoughts when he is younger, and change them when he gets older, he is chastised for being a hypocrite.

I haven't quite figured out what this is that causes men to behave in such ways; I just simply notice its factuality.
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The only god I believe in is me. . .

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#23058 - 04/07/09 12:50 PM Re: Friedrich Nietzsche - Antichrist [Re: Sordid Archetype]
KaosKrieg Offline
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Registered: 03/04/09
Posts: 30
Loc: NYC, USA
In fact, Nietzsche's philosophies evolved in "Human, All Too Human" where science is depicted as dispelling metaphysics. Nietzsche's works also no longer seemed attuned with the works of Wagner and Schopenhauer as his earlier works once did.

Fluid thoughts also don't make one a hypocrite, I perceive it as his thoughts evolving. One is inclined to change his/her mind if they wish.
_________________________
"Without order nothing can exist - without chaos nothing can evolve." -- Roger von Oech.

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