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#26970 - 07/09/09 02:16 AM The Future... and Now
Jake999 Offline
senior member


Registered: 11/02/08
Posts: 2230
Interesting. Not earthshaking, but definitely food for thought.

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#26971 - 07/09/09 04:43 AM Re: The Future... and Now [Re: Jake999]
6Satan6Archist6 Offline
stalker


Registered: 10/16/08
Posts: 2509
So what does it all mean?

Not trying to sound cute by asking that. But, really, so what? The data proposed there, if accurate, is something to ruminate over; but what are we to do with it?
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#26972 - 07/09/09 04:51 AM Re: The Future... and Now [Re: 6Satan6Archist6]
Dimitri Offline
stalker


Registered: 07/13/08
Posts: 3139
The data can let one think about the human progression, impact, diversity and state.
Despite my young age, which makes it impossible for me to see the change at information rate/quantity and working behaviour over the past 50 or even 20 years, it "spoke" to me in a way that everything nowadays is changing at very high rate.

I can imagine for older people like jake (no offense) that this trend of advancement and rate simply is mind-blowing. Which probably is the purpose of this video: to show the information exchange or global change happening in comparance with other years/decades.

Might also let one thing about the power of numbers (referring to the indian 25% thingie..)


Edited by Dimitri (07/09/09 04:52 AM)
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#26976 - 07/09/09 05:28 AM Re: The Future... and Now [Re: Dimitri]
god.over.djinn Offline
pledge


Registered: 06/23/09
Posts: 75
Loc: Melbourne
Interesting video, Jake.

There was a point that I disagree with. The video said that "For students starting a 4 year technical degree, this means that half of what they learn in their first year of study will be outdated by their third year of study."

In fact, this doesn't follow from "the amount of new technical information is doubling every two years."

First year students in any technical degree only learn the stuff that is uncontroversial. Stuff that's been known since the 19th century... and this stuff isn't going out of date. New information at the cutting edge of science doesn't change basic facts in algebra, calculus and geometry, nor does it change the basics of good experimental design (randomisation, repetition and control), or methods of doing simple analysis on the results from that experiment.

It is not until maybe at the end of your entry-level four-year technical degree that you start getting exposed to newish results. But even then, if the information is being presented to undergraduates of any calibre, odds are on that it is not information that is going to become "outdated" in a hurry. Money talks and undergrads fork out a fortune for degrees that are expected to yield dividends.

Even after you start getting into the real meaty bits of science as a postgrad student or a researcher, you realise more and more how important that first year really was. And it doesn't matter how long ago you did first year for this to be true.

G.O.D.
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SATAN, a recursive acronym invented by GOD: "SATAN: Advocating The Adversarial Nihilist"

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