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#42876 - 09/08/10 02:52 AM Guitar Heroes!
MatthewJ1
Unregistered



Another music related thread.

I am a big fan of the guitar and I really like guitar music. I have tried to play the guitar in the past and determined (after quite a few lessons) that I was complete shite.

Do you like guitar music and if you do, who are your guitar heroes?

Here is a list of my top ten guitar heroes and a brief reason why I think they are my top ten:

1. Jimi Hendrix. This guy was just jaw dropping incredible. He somehow managed to get sounds out of the instrument that nobody else seemed to get. The king by a long mile.
2. Jeff Beck. Incredible player. I heard a story that when Mick Taylor left the Rolling Stones in the mid 1970’s Jeff Beck was thinking of joining the Stones. I’m glad he didn’t because he and Richards probably would have cancelled each other out I think or at least had ego problems. Beck is a beautiful player and his solos are just scorching.
3. Jimmy Page. I grew up on Led Zeppelin and Page was the main reason why I got into guitar music.
4. Eric Clapton. I like the music he made with Cream, Blind Faith, John Mayall, Derek and the Dominos.
5. The Kings – Albert, BB and Freddy. Sorry I am cheating a bit here and including three at number 5. These guys were so good, a pure crisp blues sound. I like Albert best cause he just a powerful player.
6. Keith Richards. I like that loose menacing sort of style he has and also Exile on Main Street is my favourite Rolling Stones album and it really features that sound. I like gritty sort of guitar.
7. Pete Townsend. Fucking aggressive guitar, that is the best way. I like his work on Live at Leeds. That bastard smashed many guitars. Legend.
8. Frank Zappa. I haven’t heard much Frank Zappa, but what I have heard is soaring and powerful stuff. I think this guy was a bit of a guitar genius.
9. Django Reinhardt. I don’t mind some jazz now and then. This guy was so good. Apparently he burnt his hand badly and it made playing guitar really difficult for him. The fact that he played so well inspires me.
10. Billy Gibbons. A legend and a guy who can make a guitar sound good and crunchy. He likes girls, hot rods and the guitar (and I think BBQ and beer as well). This of course automatically makes him the ideal candidate for leader of the free world. Good show.

Hell, there are so many not included here. Many of the guys I like are from the 1960’s and 1970’s. I reckon the best guitarists were found back then. If you disagree with this then please say so.

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#42886 - 09/08/10 12:07 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: ]
Zorg Offline
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Registered: 08/30/09
Posts: 44
Loc: A Galaxy Far, Far Away
While there are a lot of good guitarists out there, I would have to limit my list to those I have seen. Watching them put on a show adds a LOT. But, I go to few concerts. Therefore, I limit my list to 2...Ted Nugent and Zakk Wylde. I have seen a few others; but, they are not memorable.

I list The Nuge, not because he is the greatest guitarist (whatever that may mean). Rather, I discovered him during that magic moment when I was around 14 or 15. Up to that point, I had never heard anything like him. I got to see him...I believe it was 1977, or so, in Charlotte, NC. He was with Foreigner doing their "Double Vision" tour, Black Oak Arkansas and Mother's Finest. Nugent blew me away. And, he still has the energy.

I got to see Zakk a couple of years ago in NY, playing with Ozzy. He did what must have been a 15 minute solo, giving Ozzy enough time to wipe the drool off his chin and change his undies. Seeing Rob Zombie afterward was icing on the cake.
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"The average person thinks he isn’t" Father Lorenzoni

"Plato was a bore."
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#42895 - 09/08/10 06:54 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Zorg]
TV is God Moderator Offline
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Registered: 08/11/08
Posts: 273
Loc: The Cornhole
Because of my tendency toward the experimental and unusual these are players that have a different perspective on how a guitar can be played -

Fred Frith
Got his start in the legendary rock in opposition band Henry Cow, which I personally don't care too much for, but later went on to do a lot of amazing work in the new york "downtown scene." Did many new things with the electric guitar which he states as an instrument includes any effects and amplification as the stringed wood in your hands. Plays with picks, violin bows, yarn(put a long string of yarn under a guitar string and pull for a different kind of long stroke) e-bows, and basically anything you can produce sound on a string with. A major user of the third bridge technique as well as putting a pickup at the top of the neck. Has a few albums of "prepared guitar" which include homemade and unusually altered guitars. One of the few 'extended technique' guitarists to maintain a strong sense of intentional melody even under such strange methods.
Example

Ichirou Agata
Guitar in the very unique Melt Banana, a band from tokyo that has a very upbeat yet fast aggressive sound somewhere between noise-rock and hardcore. His sound is recognizable from rapid trapped delays and extensive use of slide pitch pedal to produce a noisy sound that often plays like a track of sound-effects.
Not the best quality but a good example

Keiji Haino
I'm new to Haino so not extensively knowledgeable of all he does. The majority seems to be free improv so it's a bit more noisy or conceptual and less "musical" than most. Usually improvises on just about anything with strings on it but when he's on standard guitar setup he looks like he's playing in fast motion with as fast as his hand slides up and down the neck hitting un-melodic notes at rapidfire speed. Certainly not everyone's cup of tea, he scores higher points with the Merzbow crowd than the Steve Vai crowd.
Here on the right with his signature grey hair and sunglasses

Trey Spruance
Of Mr. Bungle and Secret Chiefs 3 fame he always shows his skill and sensibility in incorporating many diverse styles in his playing. He's the only guitarist I've ever heard that uses an auto-wah as his signature effect. Seems to think more like a composer than a guitar player with his performance as most of his noted influences are film composers. Incorporates a lot of bollywood and persian style in a more "rock-ish" structure.
Secret Chiefs 3

Sonny Sharrock
The B.B. King of experimental music. A major innovator in freejazz guitar and huge influence on Jimi Hendrix. He wanted to play saxaphone but asthma made it too difficult. He picked up guitar but called himself "a horn player with a really fucked up axe." He had an unique sense of harmony and structure. You've probably heard his guitar on the theme to cartoon network's Space Ghost Cost to Cost.
Again freejazz = not everyone's cup of tea
Sonny with Last Exit. Also features some impressive bass from Bill Laswell

I think it's also necessary to name John Lennon and George Harrison who were much more experimental and outlandish in their effects and technique than they're usually noted for. Also to Jack White and Jimi Page who think outside the box when it comes to guitar playing. And to Jimi Hendrix which if not for his massive popularity and influence on popular technique would be considered a noisy strange avant-garde experimenter today.

Les Claypool(Bass but 'to-may-to', 'to-mah-to')
Anyone who has heard Primus knows this guy's skill and style. Plays parts more like "lead guitar" and "rhythm guitar" on a bass. Paired with his rather unusual voice he creates a real one of a kind sound and aesthetic.

Primus

A notable performance of the beginning of Master of Puppets with him playing the lead on bass

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#42908 - 09/09/10 01:22 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Zorg]
Nyte Offline
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Registered: 10/19/09
Posts: 380
Loc: Ohio
 Originally Posted By: Zorg
While there are a lot of good guitarists out there, I would have to limit my list to those I have seen. Watching them put on a show adds a LOT. But, I go to few concerts. Therefore, I limit my list to 2...Ted Nugent and Zakk Wylde. I have seen a few others; but, they are not memorable.

I list The Nuge, not because he is the greatest guitarist (whatever that may mean). Rather, I discovered him during that magic moment when I was around 14 or 15. Up to that point, I had never heard anything like him. I got to see him...I believe it was 1977, or so, in Charlotte, NC. He was with Foreigner doing their "Double Vision" tour, Black Oak Arkansas and Mother's Finest. Nugent blew me away. And, he still has the energy.

I got to see Zakk a couple of years ago in NY, playing with Ozzy. He did what must have been a 15 minute solo, giving Ozzy enough time to wipe the drool off his chin and change his undies. Seeing Rob Zombie afterward was icing on the cake.


You do know that Zakk Wylde was influenced by Randy Rhoads, right? I listened to a black market album from Ozzy's (when he first went solo) very early days with Rhoads and to hear that man play was completely incredible. You knew it was a black market album because of the fact nothing was cut from the album and included all the in-between discussions him and Ozzy had about the music and what was being played. He was one of the best guitarists I had ever listened to and I've listened to quite a few. I have my other favorites but he stood out.
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#42921 - 09/10/10 03:49 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Nyte]
Zorg Offline
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Registered: 08/30/09
Posts: 44
Loc: A Galaxy Far, Far Away
 Originally Posted By: Nyte

You do know that Zakk Wylde was influenced by Randy Rhoads, right?



Yep...but I never got the chance to see Rhoads. Like I said, there's something about actually seeing someone perform.
_________________________
"The average person thinks he isn’t" Father Lorenzoni

"Plato was a bore."
Friedrich Nietzsche

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#42960 - 09/11/10 11:53 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Zorg]
paolo sette Offline
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Registered: 12/12/08
Posts: 263
Loc: IL, USA
Music is an outlet to aid in expressing and receiving feelings in which I listen to practically everyday, and I'm listening to right now as I'm typing: (The legendary Danzig). The guitar is a sine qua non component of a typical band nowadays: lead or bass or any inbetween. The electrical guitar is what I like for it can hit unique musical notes whence reverberates mellifluous sounds, if the player is well-versed. You know...I read through the posts, and I haven't been to a concert in approximately three years. Huh. It may be a little longer, but I enjoy seeing a metal band play no matter the experience level. Actually, I prefer to see new metal bands play minus tribute bands. Personally, I think tribute bands decimate the original script by not sounding quite right. Then, again, that's one reason why they call themselves a 'tribute'.

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#43010 - 09/13/10 08:01 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: paolo sette]
Zorg Offline
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Registered: 08/30/09
Posts: 44
Loc: A Galaxy Far, Far Away
 Originally Posted By: paolo sette
Actually, I prefer to see new metal bands play minus tribute bands. Personally, I think tribute bands decimate the original script by not sounding quite right. Then, again, that's one reason why they call themselves a 'tribute'.



I get that. I catch my eyes rolling any time I hear an entertainer announce that "this piece is an homage".
_________________________
"The average person thinks he isn’t" Father Lorenzoni

"Plato was a bore."
Friedrich Nietzsche

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#43015 - 09/13/10 07:41 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Zorg]
TV is God Moderator Offline
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Registered: 08/11/08
Posts: 273
Loc: The Cornhole
Just realizing there were some very important names miseed-

Ritchie Blackmore- I think he was a major influence on how rock/metal guitarists after him played. Just listen to the long jams on Deep Purple's live album Made In Japan. It's amazing stuff.

Eddie Van Halen- What's there to say? Guitar is like another organ of this man's body. If he lost his voice to throat cancer he could probably get by communicating with one.

Tonny Iommi- Though not a mindbogglingly technical guitarist he basically came up with the metal guitar sound. Such power in drama in those chords and don't overlook the jazzy breaks they would occasionally go into.

Dave Mustaine- MUSTAINE. KICKS. ASS. Just listen to 'Holy Wars... Punishment Due' and you'll hear how he creates such amazing and exciting thrash metal but how he doesn't always follow the templates of how that's done.

Chuck Schuldiner- Often called the "father of death metal" his work with Death is just amazing. I'm especially fond of their 90s albums which I think served as the template for the technical metal we hear today before it was watered down and beaten to death.

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#43025 - 09/14/10 11:54 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: TV is God]
ta2zz Offline
veteran member


Registered: 08/28/07
Posts: 1552
Loc: Connecticut

Django Reinhardt had two working fingers on his left (fretting) hand. Django Reinhardt - J'attendrai Swing 1939

Tony Iommi in an accident lost the fingertips of two fingers on his left (fretting) hand. Heard the music of guess who… Yes Django Reinhardt then relearns to play first with two fingers and then with plastic fingertip extenders. The first of which he made himself. Tony Iommi interview '08 on the start of Heavy Metal
Heaven and Hell - I Live

Did anybody mention Andy Summers from the police or how about Al DiMeola? I mean seriously Al DiMeola is good enough for Zakk Wylde to listen to him. Al Di Meola - Race With The Devil on a Spanish Hwy

Robert Fripp who used to frequent the music store that Andy Summers worked at is a Guitar legend as well. Robert Fripp - Frippertronics Demonstration '79

Interesting how they all touched each other in some way. Also interesting how a disability started the metal sound well that and drop tuning.

Enjoy


Edited by ta2zz (09/14/10 11:58 PM)
Edit Reason: formatting issue
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#43026 - 09/15/10 10:05 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: ta2zz]
Lamar Offline
member


Registered: 02/03/10
Posts: 226
Loc: Alabama
Actually, I'd like to put down my uncle as my personal guitar hero. He's been playing longer than I've been alive. Back in the day he was in a local Punk-Metal band called Dead Flesh. They probably would've went a long way if alcoholism hadn't have gotten to their drummer (my drummer hero haha and as a matter of fact, the reason I am a drummer today). These days my uncle plays...uh...what was it, classical guitar I think. He owns the guitar and is my all time favorite Guitar Hero.
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#43029 - 09/15/10 07:01 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Lamar]
FriendlyS Offline
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Registered: 10/05/09
Posts: 39
Loc: Toronto, Canada
I have a lot, so I won't bother listing them all but I'm surprised no one has mentioned Ynwei Malmsteen yet. He's pretty kick ass. He was trained in classical guitar but shreds like a mad man and plays awesome metal.

Far Beyond the Sun , enjoy!

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#43030 - 09/15/10 08:00 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: FriendlyS]
Jake999 Offline
senior member


Registered: 11/02/08
Posts: 2230
Over the past 60+ years, I've heard guitar virtuosos of every type... I have to admit that some of the new JUST HIT A STRING STUPID guitarists don't do much to me, but then, I've seen "The Shaman (Carlos Santana)" play up close and personal... and Clapton when he was in Cream, etc.

When people argue over who's the guitar MASTER, I'm always reminded of a little joke:

Pete Townshend of the The Who and Andreas Segovia were being interviewed on who was the best guitar player. Maestro Sevgovia simply picked up his guitar and launched into a brilliantly executed Flamenco piece, his hands flying over the strings and nursing the most beautiful of notes with his fretwork. Moments later, he quietly and reverently rested his guitar in its case. The audience, knowing that this was a once in a lifetime virtuoso performance, applauded and cheered BRAVO!

Pete Townshend then picked up his guitard and, in his signature windmill, struck one LOUD, nerve shattering note, took a drag off of his cigarette and put his guitar down on the floor. The crowd looked shocked, but appreciative, as the interviewer asked, "Mr. Townshend... sir... I've seen Maestro Segovia's presentation, and indeed I've seen yours here today. He played a thousand beautiful notes to your one. How can you explain the vast differences in style?"

Townshend took a drag off of his cigarette and whimsically blew smoke rings into the air. He then looked at the interviewer and said, "Obviously, he's still looking for it, and I know where it's at."


Edited by Jake999 (09/15/10 08:03 PM)
Edit Reason: For some reason, some didn't post!

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#43032 - 09/15/10 10:36 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Jake999]
Octavius Offline
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Registered: 08/28/07
Posts: 557
Loc: Left the party
Awesome story, Jake. Reminds me of another one...

Neil Young was being interviewed by a reporter from Guitar Player magazine years ago and was asked why he put Bigsby tremolo systems on all of his guitars. (Bigsby were the first tremolo systems to be developed for guitars...precursors to today's Khaler and Floyd Rose systems) The interviewer went on to say that Bigsbys were notorious for making the guitar fall out of tune when used...

Neil replied, "Hell, ANYONE can play IN tune..."
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#43035 - 09/16/10 12:02 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Octavius]
TV is God Moderator Offline
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Registered: 08/11/08
Posts: 273
Loc: The Cornhole
There's a documentary called It Might Get Loud that came out recently about guitar. I regret not being able to see it yet but it features Jack White, Jimmy Page, and The Edge talking all things guitar. As I'm not really a fan of U2 my version of the film would be something more like White, Page, Ichirou Agata, and Fred Frith.

The Neil Young story definitely reminded me of Jack White. His primary guitars are old Sears Silvertones. They're now mostly traded as collectibles and rarely played because they.. they're frustrating to say the least. I had one once and it had to be the most difficult to play guitar I've ever touched. Tuning was near impossible (compared to modern guitars, I'm sure it was the norm then.) He's stated that when he plays guitar he wants it to be a struggle. Somewhat the same mentality of Megadeth saying they want to play faster than they're comfortable with but directed in a different way. At first glance you may think this guy is just a 'garage rocker' selling a retro angle but if you dig deeper you'll find what he does is not that simple and not that shallow.

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#43041 - 09/16/10 08:28 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: TV is God]
Clicks Offline
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Registered: 06/14/10
Posts: 114
Loc: New Orleans
Having played guitar for 10 years myself, I've learned that I value passion and emotion in the music more than technicality or being able to make weird sounds. When it works with the music, cool, when it doesn't I just don't want to hear it.

I started playing guitar when I was 10, and went through 3 phases. At first, I didn't want to play anything other than power chords and simple riffs because I just didn't like the the technicality. Then, I started listening to Tech Death and Black metal and for a couple years put all my focus toward learning crazy shit and being a shred god. Now, I really just play for the feeling. I still love all my older material from like 5 or 6 years ago and all the music I've ever been attached to, because I guess I had always been about to feeling of music. I also still love challenging myself in my music when I write to come up with something that I can't quite play yet, and so I get better with my instrument as I write. But if the technicality kills it, I'm fine with leaving it simple and repetitive, as long as I got the emotion I wanted. Not really well versed in any style at all other than Black Metal, but I know how to get whatever sound I want out of my guitar.

So, that being said, when I think of great guitarists, it runs the range from guitarist that I'm sure I bested at 13 like Richard from Rammstein to the shred gods of Death Metal like Pat O'Brian of Cannibal Corpse. However, I have my own taste and don't really get into Hendix, Clapton, or Page. I love just about every kind of music, but I guess I just see guitarists differently than most people. So, without further ado, my list...

1. Richard Bernstein of Rammstein
-Rammstein was the first Metalish band that I really listened to. Before them I was all about the Trance at age 8 or 9. I started off playing Rammstein songs on my brother's acoustic guitar when he left to boot camp. All of Rammstein's music is very simple and Repetitive, but even after 10 years of listening, I keep coming back to it because of Richard's very simplistic, dark style. Mainly just power chords, but he uses them well.

!
Note: After this point they aren't in any particular order.
!

2. Pat O'Brian of Cannibal Corpse
-Not a lot of people can derive any kind of emotion or meaning from Death Metal. The early lyrics in Death Metal were all gore and the guitar riffs were sluggish palm muted power cords. Cannibal Corpse started out the same way. After Pat O'Brian entered the band, the sound changed a lot. It was still extremely heavy, but it became very technical. Pat does a damn good job of playing impossible riffs and solos and at the same time keeping a sound of frenzied terror and killing. Frantic Disembowelment just about makes me punch something every damn time. I remember spraining my pinky finger trying to learn that song a few years ago.

3. Rob Barret of Cannibal Corpse
-Just because he comes up with some perfect, thrashy as all hell rhythm guitar to throw behind Pat's leads. His material can be just as difficult as Pat's and all keeps that terror sort of feeling.

4. Nergal of Behemoth
-Got into these guys just a few years ago, when I heard they're newer Blackened Death sound. Nergal has a very militaristic sound, as in kind of formal and structured, but at the same time is crazy as hell. Slaves Shall Serve is what sold me on them. Later I looked up their back catalog of pure black metal, and was just as taken with his guitar playing. It was violent black metal, but not just atonal and generic sounding like a lot of bands of the second wave. I actually got something other than aggression and anger out of it.

5. Jewel
-I had known of Jewel my entire life, but never listened to her music, or if I had, didn't recognize it as her. While I was home on recruiter's assistance last April, I was driving around with the other guy on RA when You Were Meant for Me came on the radio. I knew the song, but never knew who it was. Didn't say on the radio who it was, and the other didn't know. I went home and googled the chorus. Downloaded Pieces of You and it instantly became one of my top albums. It's like, the way she plays could be considered up beat, in a slow way, or something?, but at the same time, it's dark, which fits the way she didn't really sing about anything too positive very often on the album. I just dig her vibe, man.

6. Jesper Stromblad of In Flames
-Some early Swedish Melodic Death Metal. Actually the first kind of any Death Metal I listened to. Hadn't quite developed a taste for anything heavier yet. Anyway, I just love his melodies. There's a lot of folk influence in his Metal material, and then his has his straight folky songs and passages. There was also a decent amount of blues influence in his music. I think I listen to the song Everdying mainly just for the acoustics in the last minute or so more than I listen to most other songs. It's too bad he changed his sound up so much. I almost can't stand listening to his new stuff just because I get to thinking "I'll probably never hear anything like Lunar Strain again." It's decent music, it just seems like a betrayal to me.

7. Samantha Escarbe of Virgin Black
-I think I got into Virgina Black around the same time I got into Depressive Suicidal Black Metal and Funeral Doom, 3 years ago. Her music isn't complex by any means, but just the overwhelming depression you can hear in the music gets me off every time. ...And I am Suffering I consider a masterpiece.

8. Dave Matthews
-I can pic Dave out of any collection of music, but at the same time, he has a very varied sound in his music. When you listen to Dave Matthews Band it really seems to kinda over power the guitar work. However, listening to him play solo or with Tim Reynolds you can really hear all the emotion he puts into his playing. And it's skilled to boot. I consider him more a musician than a guitarist, which really goes for everyone on my list.

9. Euronymous of Mayhem
-For as petty and obsessed with his image and out-eviling all his contemporaries, his music sounded like what he wanted to be: dark and evil. I really think he was trying to be his music, which to me seems like he was really in touch with a part of himself that he didn't know, which is weird. Also a very simplistic style, but when I think second wave of Black Metal, I think Mayhem and the atonal, powerful, evil riffs that Euronymous churned out.

10. Jónsi Birgisson of Sigur Rós
-If ever there was such a thing as emotion, this man would be the pure embodiment of it. I think this is really the only guitarist I listen to that uses his instrument to get weird sounds. He plays primarily with a bow, making whale sounds. I've seriously teared up listening to Sigur Rós. Jónsi, I consider, to be a master of passion.

And just because I had 2 guitarists from the same band...

11. Thomas Angell and Anders Eek of Funeral(Nor)
-The first Funeral Doom band, Funeral. These two men weaved together some of the most slow, depressing, heavily classically inspired workings of genius I have ever heard. When you think being depressed to the point that all you can see or imagine is being stuck in a black void with nothing but heartbreak and bad memories, you should also think Funeral. The first releases are somewhere in my top 25. I fall asleep to Funeral pretty often, because even though it's extremely depressing, it's also very relaxing. It's something I would listen to while sitting in front of my fire place, reading classical novels and studying the down beat expressions on the faces of the people in the portraits on my walls. Also there's a bear skin rug on the floor and some huge books cases built into the walls. Classical depression? I don't know, I just love Funeral.


So there you have it, my guitar heroes and explanations for why I love their music. There are tons more worth a mention that have had a large influence on my taste in music my style of playing, but I think I've written enough.

Thank you vury much for reading.
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