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#42876 - 09/08/10 02:52 AM Guitar Heroes!
MatthewJ1
Unregistered



Another music related thread.

I am a big fan of the guitar and I really like guitar music. I have tried to play the guitar in the past and determined (after quite a few lessons) that I was complete shite.

Do you like guitar music and if you do, who are your guitar heroes?

Here is a list of my top ten guitar heroes and a brief reason why I think they are my top ten:

1. Jimi Hendrix. This guy was just jaw dropping incredible. He somehow managed to get sounds out of the instrument that nobody else seemed to get. The king by a long mile.
2. Jeff Beck. Incredible player. I heard a story that when Mick Taylor left the Rolling Stones in the mid 1970’s Jeff Beck was thinking of joining the Stones. I’m glad he didn’t because he and Richards probably would have cancelled each other out I think or at least had ego problems. Beck is a beautiful player and his solos are just scorching.
3. Jimmy Page. I grew up on Led Zeppelin and Page was the main reason why I got into guitar music.
4. Eric Clapton. I like the music he made with Cream, Blind Faith, John Mayall, Derek and the Dominos.
5. The Kings – Albert, BB and Freddy. Sorry I am cheating a bit here and including three at number 5. These guys were so good, a pure crisp blues sound. I like Albert best cause he just a powerful player.
6. Keith Richards. I like that loose menacing sort of style he has and also Exile on Main Street is my favourite Rolling Stones album and it really features that sound. I like gritty sort of guitar.
7. Pete Townsend. Fucking aggressive guitar, that is the best way. I like his work on Live at Leeds. That bastard smashed many guitars. Legend.
8. Frank Zappa. I haven’t heard much Frank Zappa, but what I have heard is soaring and powerful stuff. I think this guy was a bit of a guitar genius.
9. Django Reinhardt. I don’t mind some jazz now and then. This guy was so good. Apparently he burnt his hand badly and it made playing guitar really difficult for him. The fact that he played so well inspires me.
10. Billy Gibbons. A legend and a guy who can make a guitar sound good and crunchy. He likes girls, hot rods and the guitar (and I think BBQ and beer as well). This of course automatically makes him the ideal candidate for leader of the free world. Good show.

Hell, there are so many not included here. Many of the guys I like are from the 1960’s and 1970’s. I reckon the best guitarists were found back then. If you disagree with this then please say so.

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#42886 - 09/08/10 12:07 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: ]
Zorg Offline
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Registered: 08/30/09
Posts: 44
Loc: A Galaxy Far, Far Away
While there are a lot of good guitarists out there, I would have to limit my list to those I have seen. Watching them put on a show adds a LOT. But, I go to few concerts. Therefore, I limit my list to 2...Ted Nugent and Zakk Wylde. I have seen a few others; but, they are not memorable.

I list The Nuge, not because he is the greatest guitarist (whatever that may mean). Rather, I discovered him during that magic moment when I was around 14 or 15. Up to that point, I had never heard anything like him. I got to see him...I believe it was 1977, or so, in Charlotte, NC. He was with Foreigner doing their "Double Vision" tour, Black Oak Arkansas and Mother's Finest. Nugent blew me away. And, he still has the energy.

I got to see Zakk a couple of years ago in NY, playing with Ozzy. He did what must have been a 15 minute solo, giving Ozzy enough time to wipe the drool off his chin and change his undies. Seeing Rob Zombie afterward was icing on the cake.
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"The average person thinks he isn’t" Father Lorenzoni

"Plato was a bore."
Friedrich Nietzsche

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#42895 - 09/08/10 06:54 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Zorg]
TV is God Moderator Offline
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Registered: 08/11/08
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Because of my tendency toward the experimental and unusual these are players that have a different perspective on how a guitar can be played -

Fred Frith
Got his start in the legendary rock in opposition band Henry Cow, which I personally don't care too much for, but later went on to do a lot of amazing work in the new york "downtown scene." Did many new things with the electric guitar which he states as an instrument includes any effects and amplification as the stringed wood in your hands. Plays with picks, violin bows, yarn(put a long string of yarn under a guitar string and pull for a different kind of long stroke) e-bows, and basically anything you can produce sound on a string with. A major user of the third bridge technique as well as putting a pickup at the top of the neck. Has a few albums of "prepared guitar" which include homemade and unusually altered guitars. One of the few 'extended technique' guitarists to maintain a strong sense of intentional melody even under such strange methods.
Example

Ichirou Agata
Guitar in the very unique Melt Banana, a band from tokyo that has a very upbeat yet fast aggressive sound somewhere between noise-rock and hardcore. His sound is recognizable from rapid trapped delays and extensive use of slide pitch pedal to produce a noisy sound that often plays like a track of sound-effects.
Not the best quality but a good example

Keiji Haino
I'm new to Haino so not extensively knowledgeable of all he does. The majority seems to be free improv so it's a bit more noisy or conceptual and less "musical" than most. Usually improvises on just about anything with strings on it but when he's on standard guitar setup he looks like he's playing in fast motion with as fast as his hand slides up and down the neck hitting un-melodic notes at rapidfire speed. Certainly not everyone's cup of tea, he scores higher points with the Merzbow crowd than the Steve Vai crowd.
Here on the right with his signature grey hair and sunglasses

Trey Spruance
Of Mr. Bungle and Secret Chiefs 3 fame he always shows his skill and sensibility in incorporating many diverse styles in his playing. He's the only guitarist I've ever heard that uses an auto-wah as his signature effect. Seems to think more like a composer than a guitar player with his performance as most of his noted influences are film composers. Incorporates a lot of bollywood and persian style in a more "rock-ish" structure.
Secret Chiefs 3

Sonny Sharrock
The B.B. King of experimental music. A major innovator in freejazz guitar and huge influence on Jimi Hendrix. He wanted to play saxaphone but asthma made it too difficult. He picked up guitar but called himself "a horn player with a really fucked up axe." He had an unique sense of harmony and structure. You've probably heard his guitar on the theme to cartoon network's Space Ghost Cost to Cost.
Again freejazz = not everyone's cup of tea
Sonny with Last Exit. Also features some impressive bass from Bill Laswell

I think it's also necessary to name John Lennon and George Harrison who were much more experimental and outlandish in their effects and technique than they're usually noted for. Also to Jack White and Jimi Page who think outside the box when it comes to guitar playing. And to Jimi Hendrix which if not for his massive popularity and influence on popular technique would be considered a noisy strange avant-garde experimenter today.

Les Claypool(Bass but 'to-may-to', 'to-mah-to')
Anyone who has heard Primus knows this guy's skill and style. Plays parts more like "lead guitar" and "rhythm guitar" on a bass. Paired with his rather unusual voice he creates a real one of a kind sound and aesthetic.

Primus

A notable performance of the beginning of Master of Puppets with him playing the lead on bass

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#42908 - 09/09/10 01:22 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Zorg]
Nyte Offline
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Registered: 10/19/09
Posts: 380
Loc: Ohio
 Originally Posted By: Zorg
While there are a lot of good guitarists out there, I would have to limit my list to those I have seen. Watching them put on a show adds a LOT. But, I go to few concerts. Therefore, I limit my list to 2...Ted Nugent and Zakk Wylde. I have seen a few others; but, they are not memorable.

I list The Nuge, not because he is the greatest guitarist (whatever that may mean). Rather, I discovered him during that magic moment when I was around 14 or 15. Up to that point, I had never heard anything like him. I got to see him...I believe it was 1977, or so, in Charlotte, NC. He was with Foreigner doing their "Double Vision" tour, Black Oak Arkansas and Mother's Finest. Nugent blew me away. And, he still has the energy.

I got to see Zakk a couple of years ago in NY, playing with Ozzy. He did what must have been a 15 minute solo, giving Ozzy enough time to wipe the drool off his chin and change his undies. Seeing Rob Zombie afterward was icing on the cake.


You do know that Zakk Wylde was influenced by Randy Rhoads, right? I listened to a black market album from Ozzy's (when he first went solo) very early days with Rhoads and to hear that man play was completely incredible. You knew it was a black market album because of the fact nothing was cut from the album and included all the in-between discussions him and Ozzy had about the music and what was being played. He was one of the best guitarists I had ever listened to and I've listened to quite a few. I have my other favorites but he stood out.
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#42921 - 09/10/10 03:49 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Nyte]
Zorg Offline
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Registered: 08/30/09
Posts: 44
Loc: A Galaxy Far, Far Away
 Originally Posted By: Nyte

You do know that Zakk Wylde was influenced by Randy Rhoads, right?



Yep...but I never got the chance to see Rhoads. Like I said, there's something about actually seeing someone perform.
_________________________
"The average person thinks he isn’t" Father Lorenzoni

"Plato was a bore."
Friedrich Nietzsche

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#42960 - 09/11/10 11:53 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Zorg]
paolo sette Offline
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Registered: 12/12/08
Posts: 263
Loc: IL, USA
Music is an outlet to aid in expressing and receiving feelings in which I listen to practically everyday, and I'm listening to right now as I'm typing: (The legendary Danzig). The guitar is a sine qua non component of a typical band nowadays: lead or bass or any inbetween. The electrical guitar is what I like for it can hit unique musical notes whence reverberates mellifluous sounds, if the player is well-versed. You know...I read through the posts, and I haven't been to a concert in approximately three years. Huh. It may be a little longer, but I enjoy seeing a metal band play no matter the experience level. Actually, I prefer to see new metal bands play minus tribute bands. Personally, I think tribute bands decimate the original script by not sounding quite right. Then, again, that's one reason why they call themselves a 'tribute'.

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#43010 - 09/13/10 08:01 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: paolo sette]
Zorg Offline
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Registered: 08/30/09
Posts: 44
Loc: A Galaxy Far, Far Away
 Originally Posted By: paolo sette
Actually, I prefer to see new metal bands play minus tribute bands. Personally, I think tribute bands decimate the original script by not sounding quite right. Then, again, that's one reason why they call themselves a 'tribute'.



I get that. I catch my eyes rolling any time I hear an entertainer announce that "this piece is an homage".
_________________________
"The average person thinks he isn’t" Father Lorenzoni

"Plato was a bore."
Friedrich Nietzsche

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#43015 - 09/13/10 07:41 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Zorg]
TV is God Moderator Offline
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Registered: 08/11/08
Posts: 273
Loc: The Cornhole
Just realizing there were some very important names miseed-

Ritchie Blackmore- I think he was a major influence on how rock/metal guitarists after him played. Just listen to the long jams on Deep Purple's live album Made In Japan. It's amazing stuff.

Eddie Van Halen- What's there to say? Guitar is like another organ of this man's body. If he lost his voice to throat cancer he could probably get by communicating with one.

Tonny Iommi- Though not a mindbogglingly technical guitarist he basically came up with the metal guitar sound. Such power in drama in those chords and don't overlook the jazzy breaks they would occasionally go into.

Dave Mustaine- MUSTAINE. KICKS. ASS. Just listen to 'Holy Wars... Punishment Due' and you'll hear how he creates such amazing and exciting thrash metal but how he doesn't always follow the templates of how that's done.

Chuck Schuldiner- Often called the "father of death metal" his work with Death is just amazing. I'm especially fond of their 90s albums which I think served as the template for the technical metal we hear today before it was watered down and beaten to death.

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#43025 - 09/14/10 11:54 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: TV is God]
ta2zz Offline
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Registered: 08/28/07
Posts: 1552
Loc: Connecticut

Django Reinhardt had two working fingers on his left (fretting) hand. Django Reinhardt - J'attendrai Swing 1939

Tony Iommi in an accident lost the fingertips of two fingers on his left (fretting) hand. Heard the music of guess who… Yes Django Reinhardt then relearns to play first with two fingers and then with plastic fingertip extenders. The first of which he made himself. Tony Iommi interview '08 on the start of Heavy Metal
Heaven and Hell - I Live

Did anybody mention Andy Summers from the police or how about Al DiMeola? I mean seriously Al DiMeola is good enough for Zakk Wylde to listen to him. Al Di Meola - Race With The Devil on a Spanish Hwy

Robert Fripp who used to frequent the music store that Andy Summers worked at is a Guitar legend as well. Robert Fripp - Frippertronics Demonstration '79

Interesting how they all touched each other in some way. Also interesting how a disability started the metal sound well that and drop tuning.

Enjoy


Edited by ta2zz (09/14/10 11:58 PM)
Edit Reason: formatting issue
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#43026 - 09/15/10 10:05 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: ta2zz]
Lamar Offline
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Registered: 02/03/10
Posts: 226
Loc: Alabama
Actually, I'd like to put down my uncle as my personal guitar hero. He's been playing longer than I've been alive. Back in the day he was in a local Punk-Metal band called Dead Flesh. They probably would've went a long way if alcoholism hadn't have gotten to their drummer (my drummer hero haha and as a matter of fact, the reason I am a drummer today). These days my uncle plays...uh...what was it, classical guitar I think. He owns the guitar and is my all time favorite Guitar Hero.
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#43029 - 09/15/10 07:01 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Lamar]
FriendlyS Offline
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Registered: 10/05/09
Posts: 39
Loc: Toronto, Canada
I have a lot, so I won't bother listing them all but I'm surprised no one has mentioned Ynwei Malmsteen yet. He's pretty kick ass. He was trained in classical guitar but shreds like a mad man and plays awesome metal.

Far Beyond the Sun , enjoy!

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#43030 - 09/15/10 08:00 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: FriendlyS]
Jake999 Offline
senior member


Registered: 11/02/08
Posts: 2230
Over the past 60+ years, I've heard guitar virtuosos of every type... I have to admit that some of the new JUST HIT A STRING STUPID guitarists don't do much to me, but then, I've seen "The Shaman (Carlos Santana)" play up close and personal... and Clapton when he was in Cream, etc.

When people argue over who's the guitar MASTER, I'm always reminded of a little joke:

Pete Townshend of the The Who and Andreas Segovia were being interviewed on who was the best guitar player. Maestro Sevgovia simply picked up his guitar and launched into a brilliantly executed Flamenco piece, his hands flying over the strings and nursing the most beautiful of notes with his fretwork. Moments later, he quietly and reverently rested his guitar in its case. The audience, knowing that this was a once in a lifetime virtuoso performance, applauded and cheered BRAVO!

Pete Townshend then picked up his guitard and, in his signature windmill, struck one LOUD, nerve shattering note, took a drag off of his cigarette and put his guitar down on the floor. The crowd looked shocked, but appreciative, as the interviewer asked, "Mr. Townshend... sir... I've seen Maestro Segovia's presentation, and indeed I've seen yours here today. He played a thousand beautiful notes to your one. How can you explain the vast differences in style?"

Townshend took a drag off of his cigarette and whimsically blew smoke rings into the air. He then looked at the interviewer and said, "Obviously, he's still looking for it, and I know where it's at."


Edited by Jake999 (09/15/10 08:03 PM)
Edit Reason: For some reason, some didn't post!

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#43032 - 09/15/10 10:36 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Jake999]
Octavius Offline
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Registered: 08/28/07
Posts: 557
Loc: Left the party
Awesome story, Jake. Reminds me of another one...

Neil Young was being interviewed by a reporter from Guitar Player magazine years ago and was asked why he put Bigsby tremolo systems on all of his guitars. (Bigsby were the first tremolo systems to be developed for guitars...precursors to today's Khaler and Floyd Rose systems) The interviewer went on to say that Bigsbys were notorious for making the guitar fall out of tune when used...

Neil replied, "Hell, ANYONE can play IN tune..."
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#43035 - 09/16/10 12:02 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Octavius]
TV is God Moderator Offline
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There's a documentary called It Might Get Loud that came out recently about guitar. I regret not being able to see it yet but it features Jack White, Jimmy Page, and The Edge talking all things guitar. As I'm not really a fan of U2 my version of the film would be something more like White, Page, Ichirou Agata, and Fred Frith.

The Neil Young story definitely reminded me of Jack White. His primary guitars are old Sears Silvertones. They're now mostly traded as collectibles and rarely played because they.. they're frustrating to say the least. I had one once and it had to be the most difficult to play guitar I've ever touched. Tuning was near impossible (compared to modern guitars, I'm sure it was the norm then.) He's stated that when he plays guitar he wants it to be a struggle. Somewhat the same mentality of Megadeth saying they want to play faster than they're comfortable with but directed in a different way. At first glance you may think this guy is just a 'garage rocker' selling a retro angle but if you dig deeper you'll find what he does is not that simple and not that shallow.

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#43041 - 09/16/10 08:28 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: TV is God]
Clicks Offline
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Registered: 06/14/10
Posts: 114
Loc: New Orleans
Having played guitar for 10 years myself, I've learned that I value passion and emotion in the music more than technicality or being able to make weird sounds. When it works with the music, cool, when it doesn't I just don't want to hear it.

I started playing guitar when I was 10, and went through 3 phases. At first, I didn't want to play anything other than power chords and simple riffs because I just didn't like the the technicality. Then, I started listening to Tech Death and Black metal and for a couple years put all my focus toward learning crazy shit and being a shred god. Now, I really just play for the feeling. I still love all my older material from like 5 or 6 years ago and all the music I've ever been attached to, because I guess I had always been about to feeling of music. I also still love challenging myself in my music when I write to come up with something that I can't quite play yet, and so I get better with my instrument as I write. But if the technicality kills it, I'm fine with leaving it simple and repetitive, as long as I got the emotion I wanted. Not really well versed in any style at all other than Black Metal, but I know how to get whatever sound I want out of my guitar.

So, that being said, when I think of great guitarists, it runs the range from guitarist that I'm sure I bested at 13 like Richard from Rammstein to the shred gods of Death Metal like Pat O'Brian of Cannibal Corpse. However, I have my own taste and don't really get into Hendix, Clapton, or Page. I love just about every kind of music, but I guess I just see guitarists differently than most people. So, without further ado, my list...

1. Richard Bernstein of Rammstein
-Rammstein was the first Metalish band that I really listened to. Before them I was all about the Trance at age 8 or 9. I started off playing Rammstein songs on my brother's acoustic guitar when he left to boot camp. All of Rammstein's music is very simple and Repetitive, but even after 10 years of listening, I keep coming back to it because of Richard's very simplistic, dark style. Mainly just power chords, but he uses them well.

!
Note: After this point they aren't in any particular order.
!

2. Pat O'Brian of Cannibal Corpse
-Not a lot of people can derive any kind of emotion or meaning from Death Metal. The early lyrics in Death Metal were all gore and the guitar riffs were sluggish palm muted power cords. Cannibal Corpse started out the same way. After Pat O'Brian entered the band, the sound changed a lot. It was still extremely heavy, but it became very technical. Pat does a damn good job of playing impossible riffs and solos and at the same time keeping a sound of frenzied terror and killing. Frantic Disembowelment just about makes me punch something every damn time. I remember spraining my pinky finger trying to learn that song a few years ago.

3. Rob Barret of Cannibal Corpse
-Just because he comes up with some perfect, thrashy as all hell rhythm guitar to throw behind Pat's leads. His material can be just as difficult as Pat's and all keeps that terror sort of feeling.

4. Nergal of Behemoth
-Got into these guys just a few years ago, when I heard they're newer Blackened Death sound. Nergal has a very militaristic sound, as in kind of formal and structured, but at the same time is crazy as hell. Slaves Shall Serve is what sold me on them. Later I looked up their back catalog of pure black metal, and was just as taken with his guitar playing. It was violent black metal, but not just atonal and generic sounding like a lot of bands of the second wave. I actually got something other than aggression and anger out of it.

5. Jewel
-I had known of Jewel my entire life, but never listened to her music, or if I had, didn't recognize it as her. While I was home on recruiter's assistance last April, I was driving around with the other guy on RA when You Were Meant for Me came on the radio. I knew the song, but never knew who it was. Didn't say on the radio who it was, and the other didn't know. I went home and googled the chorus. Downloaded Pieces of You and it instantly became one of my top albums. It's like, the way she plays could be considered up beat, in a slow way, or something?, but at the same time, it's dark, which fits the way she didn't really sing about anything too positive very often on the album. I just dig her vibe, man.

6. Jesper Stromblad of In Flames
-Some early Swedish Melodic Death Metal. Actually the first kind of any Death Metal I listened to. Hadn't quite developed a taste for anything heavier yet. Anyway, I just love his melodies. There's a lot of folk influence in his Metal material, and then his has his straight folky songs and passages. There was also a decent amount of blues influence in his music. I think I listen to the song Everdying mainly just for the acoustics in the last minute or so more than I listen to most other songs. It's too bad he changed his sound up so much. I almost can't stand listening to his new stuff just because I get to thinking "I'll probably never hear anything like Lunar Strain again." It's decent music, it just seems like a betrayal to me.

7. Samantha Escarbe of Virgin Black
-I think I got into Virgina Black around the same time I got into Depressive Suicidal Black Metal and Funeral Doom, 3 years ago. Her music isn't complex by any means, but just the overwhelming depression you can hear in the music gets me off every time. ...And I am Suffering I consider a masterpiece.

8. Dave Matthews
-I can pic Dave out of any collection of music, but at the same time, he has a very varied sound in his music. When you listen to Dave Matthews Band it really seems to kinda over power the guitar work. However, listening to him play solo or with Tim Reynolds you can really hear all the emotion he puts into his playing. And it's skilled to boot. I consider him more a musician than a guitarist, which really goes for everyone on my list.

9. Euronymous of Mayhem
-For as petty and obsessed with his image and out-eviling all his contemporaries, his music sounded like what he wanted to be: dark and evil. I really think he was trying to be his music, which to me seems like he was really in touch with a part of himself that he didn't know, which is weird. Also a very simplistic style, but when I think second wave of Black Metal, I think Mayhem and the atonal, powerful, evil riffs that Euronymous churned out.

10. Jónsi Birgisson of Sigur Rós
-If ever there was such a thing as emotion, this man would be the pure embodiment of it. I think this is really the only guitarist I listen to that uses his instrument to get weird sounds. He plays primarily with a bow, making whale sounds. I've seriously teared up listening to Sigur Rós. Jónsi, I consider, to be a master of passion.

And just because I had 2 guitarists from the same band...

11. Thomas Angell and Anders Eek of Funeral(Nor)
-The first Funeral Doom band, Funeral. These two men weaved together some of the most slow, depressing, heavily classically inspired workings of genius I have ever heard. When you think being depressed to the point that all you can see or imagine is being stuck in a black void with nothing but heartbreak and bad memories, you should also think Funeral. The first releases are somewhere in my top 25. I fall asleep to Funeral pretty often, because even though it's extremely depressing, it's also very relaxing. It's something I would listen to while sitting in front of my fire place, reading classical novels and studying the down beat expressions on the faces of the people in the portraits on my walls. Also there's a bear skin rug on the floor and some huge books cases built into the walls. Classical depression? I don't know, I just love Funeral.


So there you have it, my guitar heroes and explanations for why I love their music. There are tons more worth a mention that have had a large influence on my taste in music my style of playing, but I think I've written enough.

Thank you vury much for reading.
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#43087 - 09/17/10 06:29 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Clicks]
Oxus Offline
member


Registered: 04/15/10
Posts: 509
Wow, how did I miss this thread??
I've made my living as a guitarist for 35 years (I'm 49) and studied/lived with Robert Fripp, along with master classes with dozens of great musicians in NYC and around the country.

I love listening to 'guitar' period! LOL!!
So many colors and textures and realities. It is grand World that guitarists live in.

The guitarists that blow my mind repeatedly and without fail are John McLaughlin & Robert Fripp.

I play a lot of fretless these days and bend towards ancient musics blended with modern grooves (like Arabic Maqam with NIN)
If you'd like to listen to what I'm doing these days please visit
my site - http://www.xeperaum.net

**great thread (nice to get away from all the heavy talk here for a change) let's keep talking guitar, shall we?


oXuS

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#43093 - 09/18/10 02:53 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: ]
Michael A.Aquino Offline
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Registered: 09/28/08
Posts: 2517
Loc: San Francisco, CA, USA
Good lord, all of this technical sophistication; I am in awe!

Well, I go all the way back to the Ventures, who, bless their grey hair, are still kicking guitar ass today.
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#43096 - 09/18/10 04:13 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: ]
Knievel74 Offline
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Registered: 05/18/10
Posts: 147
Loc: NY
Billy Gibbons was already mentioned so here are some guys who weren't (I think).

These are some of my influences as a guitarist.

Angus Young - Between him and his brother, they created some of the most memorable and rockin' riffs ever heard. Angus might not be technically proficient, but he plays from the heart. That's all that matters.

Ace Frehley - Again, not a virtuoso. Very mediocre. BUT! Listen to any classic KISS song and you can hum along to all of the guitar solos. That says a lot.

Chuck Berry - The grandfather of rock guitar. Need I say more?

Ted Nugent - I love this guy not only for his guitar playing but also for his in-your-face attitude.

Steve Stevens - A very good guitar player. I love his use of things like toy ray guns to get some of his sounds.

Jeff "Skunk" Baxter - He plays with such warmth and melody I could just listen to him play scales.

Gary Moore - He can be a little over the top for me sometimes and overplay. But when he holds back and just goes for a simple melody, he can get you choked up.

George Benson - He's so smooth and melodic. He makes what he does look easy. That's how good he is.

Stevie Ray Vaughn - He was a monster bluesman. Since he died, there hasn't been a blues guitarist to match him. That's my opinion, anyway.

Joe Satriani - He's just plain nuts. Absolutely fantastic. I believe he really is an alien, lol

Lindsey Buckingham - A very underrated guitarist. If you want to learn fingerpicking, you couldn't ask for a better teacher. He also has a great ear for melody.

Brian Setzer - Probably the best at what he does. A great guitarist. He's one of the few guys who can sing and play a solo at the same time.

I didn't include links to their work because each guy has a such a huge catalog.
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#43098 - 09/19/10 01:23 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Knievel74]
Michael A.Aquino Offline
stalker


Registered: 09/28/08
Posts: 2517
Loc: San Francisco, CA, USA
 Originally Posted By: Knievel74
Stevie Ray Vaughan - He was a monster bluesman. Since he died, there hasn't been a blues guitarist to match him. That's my opinion, anyway.

A great moment when SRV and Dick Dale ("King of the Surf Guitar") got together for "Pipeline"!
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Michael A. Aquino

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#43099 - 09/19/10 01:24 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Clicks]
OrgasmicKarmatic Offline
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Registered: 08/01/10
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Loc: Michigan, USA
I very much approve of Dave Matthews and the Primus. Seriously really great bands both of them. Intersting jump to see from Rammstien to Bohemoth to.. Jewel.

I have always been rather partial to Clapton myself.

And I have to throw my little brother down here. Sounds kind of goofy but he is a rather excellent player himself. Hopefully, he'll go far with his endeavors.
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#43102 - 09/19/10 05:58 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: OrgasmicKarmatic]
Nyte Offline
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Registered: 10/19/09
Posts: 380
Loc: Ohio
Ok, here's one I haven't heard named on here, Andy McKee. I've watched most of his videos and am blown away at the feel he can give guitar playing. Hope you all enjoy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ddn4MGaS3N4
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#43105 - 09/19/10 07:48 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: OrgasmicKarmatic]
Clicks Offline
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Registered: 06/14/10
Posts: 114
Loc: New Orleans
I have a very varied taste in music. Everything from Classical, to blues, to death metal, to crust punk, to folk, to trance to do whop to jazz.

And I totally forgot about Andy Mckee. He's been a favorite for a while. Also Tim Reynolds. I mentioned him with Dave Matthews, but I should have given him a spot on my top 10 (or rather 12).

A few more honorable mentions:

Karl Sanders of Nile
Akira Yamaoka (Writes the Silent Hill soundtracks)
Paolo Pieri of Malfeitor(Ita)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJe397rS8tI
I've been infatuated with that song for a couple months now.
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#43112 - 09/19/10 12:39 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Michael A.Aquino]
Oxus Offline
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Registered: 04/15/10
Posts: 509
SRV and the late great Albert King doing Stevie's Pride and Joy after Albert gives him a little 'pep' talk about soul.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPS4dyk6v7Q

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#43113 - 09/19/10 01:13 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Clicks]
Nyte Offline
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Registered: 10/19/09
Posts: 380
Loc: Ohio
There's so much hidden talent in the guitar industry. Some never heard of, like McKee, unless you stumble onto the talent by accident, like I did. Another "off the trail" talent like Antonio Forcion. Then there are guitar players like Fogerty and Folgerberg that can make a song memerable without really rippin' up on the guitar.

I've seen a lot of talent in many of the concerts I've been to. Eddie Van Halen was always one of my favorites because when the man plays you know he believes in what he's playing. Another that was great to watch front stage was Michael Monarch of Steppenwolf.

One that stands out is the lead guitarist for TSO, Al Petrelli. Just watching him play was incredible, especially when Dave Mathews came out on stage and jammed with them New Years eve just 3 years ago (almost 4 now), in Cleveland Ohio.

Like you Clicks, my range in listening music really varies and the guitar players make a big difference in what I do enjoy, for the most part. When I'm in a mood to work on something, my music choices reflect that mood.
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#43114 - 09/19/10 01:51 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Jake999]
Nyte Offline
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Registered: 10/19/09
Posts: 380
Loc: Ohio
 Originally Posted By: Jake999
Over the past 60+ years, I've heard guitar virtuosos of every type... I have to admit that some of the new JUST HIT A STRING STUPID guitarists don't do much to me, but then, I've seen "The Shaman (Carlos Santana)" play up close and personal... and Clapton when he was in Cream, etc.

When people argue over who's the guitar MASTER, I'm always reminded of a little joke:

Pete Townshend of the The Who and Andreas Segovia were being interviewed on who was the best guitar player. Maestro Sevgovia simply picked up his guitar and launched into a brilliantly executed Flamenco piece, his hands flying over the strings and nursing the most beautiful of notes with his fretwork. Moments later, he quietly and reverently rested his guitar in its case. The audience, knowing that this was a once in a lifetime virtuoso performance, applauded and cheered BRAVO!

Pete Townshend then picked up his guitard and, in his signature windmill, struck one LOUD, nerve shattering note, took a drag off of his cigarette and put his guitar down on the floor. The crowd looked shocked, but appreciative, as the interviewer asked, "Mr. Townshend... sir... I've seen Maestro Segovia's presentation, and indeed I've seen yours here today. He played a thousand beautiful notes to your one. How can you explain the vast differences in style?"

Townshend took a drag off of his cigarette and whimsically blew smoke rings into the air. He then looked at the interviewer and said, "Obviously, he's still looking for it, and I know where it's at."


I would love to see Santana play live. I've got some of his cds and I'd be willing to bet watching him is like watching poetry in motion. I don't think I'd even care if the rest of the band played with him, to be very honest.

I gotta say, so far I don't think there's been any arguing, which is a nice change. Lots of great talent given their due though and the range is, so far, well varied.
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#43116 - 09/19/10 05:25 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Nyte]
TV is God Moderator Offline
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Don't forget Michael Angelo Batio. Mostly because he's the only guy I've seen that plays a dual guitar solo... by himself. Even if his shows are pretty much nothing but "hey look I can play two guitars at once" I'm still amazed how he does this.
On top of that I think he's the fastest guitar player I've ever heard. Although I honestly don't like much of his music he's still quite a guitar god.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rutyA12z3Ok
He starts playing both necks about one minute in.


Edited by TV is God (09/19/10 05:27 PM)

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#43132 - 09/20/10 04:07 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: ]
Fnord Offline
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Registered: 01/11/10
Posts: 2085
Loc: Texas
I most definitely lack the acumen and/or sophistication to tell which guitarist is best of all, but I know what I like.

I grew up listening to my dad's favorite, Chet Atkins who I appreciate for pure complexity in his playing.

The first guitarist I remember being blown away by was Mason Williams (of Smothers Brothers fame). There is a pure guitar version of Classical Gas out there somewhere though evidently not on youtube. HERE is the guitar + orchestra version which, to me, isn't nearly as powerful... but you'll get the idea.

Ted Nugent, back in the day, was an awesome force on the axe. In fact, his song Stranglehold is one of my personal favorite guitar pieces. Ted's still going strong, HERE is Stranglehold circa 2008. In concert, Ted is all about jamming out.

Another I've always loved is Mark Knopfler from Dire Straits. There is some great guitar work in nearly all of their songs but Sultans of Swing is probably the most illustrative example (though the solo is cut off in this video).

Greg Lake of Emerson, Lake & Palmer was fantastic in a live show I saw way back when. It was much like this video, Greg on a stool doing what he's best at.

For straight out tugging at my heart strings I have to go with David Gilmour of Pink Floyd. There's something very sad about his style but I just love it. Pink Floyd is most definitely in my top 10 for the combination of Gilmour's guitar & Waters' lyrics. great stuff.

I can't fail to mention Angus Young of AC/DC. Unsophisticated, simple and in your face. Fine tuning not necessary. Young is just balls out, I love his stuff.

Alvin Lee of Ten Years After should probably get a mention on my list. When I'd Love to Change the World came out, there wasn't anything quite like it out there. If you listen to the song you'll hear the guitar progressively becoming more and more prominent. Anyway, great stuff. is he a 'hero'? maybe not, but an an influence on other heroes to be certain.

Eddie Van Halen, obviously, is unrivaled in his pioneering of the 'tapping' style of guitar solo. Here's an example... I've seen Van Halen live probably 5 or 6 times, all amazing shows and everyone was always most looking forward to EVH's solo. No one sounds like him.

I also love Dickey Betts from The Allman Brothers band. His style is kind of laid back but often times it just sounds perfect to me (back yard by the pool with a cold beer).

Man, I'm burning too much time on this. I could go on for days. I love Iommi, Randy Rhodes (who I saw right before he died), Joe Walsh, Alex Lifeson (Rush) and about a gazillion others.

I've got NO talent for music but there is so much of it that I love.
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#43133 - 09/20/10 06:31 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Fnord]
MatthewJ1
Unregistered



Some more I love:

1. Steve Cropper - because he is the best. Woo Hoo!

2. Mississippi John Hurt - His music is some of the most beautiful I have heard. The recordings I have are from the period when he was rediscovered. Beautiful intimate guitarist.

3. Scotty Moore - love that bare bones Sun sound.

4. Buddy Guy.

5. George Harrison - he should have been in my first list. Understated but indispensable.

6. Robert Johnson.

7. Elmore James - Love that goddamned blues guitar. Would include Muddy Waters here. Waters played a mean guitar as well.

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#43146 - 09/22/10 12:32 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: ]
Nyte Offline
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Registered: 10/19/09
Posts: 380
Loc: Ohio
Wow, the lists just keep growing and growing. Fnord, I'm with you on not being able to strum a chord, but I know what I like and good guitar playing is one of them. There's something about listening to someone that can really play a guitar. I also saw Eddie several times (I lost track after 7) during the Sammy Hagar era of Van Halen.

I'm kind of surprised no one has mentioned Slash, formally of Guns and Roses, now with Velvet Revolver. He's got some great talent and the unique solos he seems to fit into just about every song he plays makes him stand out. Or at least I would have thought.
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#43153 - 09/22/10 05:05 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Nyte]
Clicks Offline
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Posts: 114
Loc: New Orleans
I don't think I like anything I've ever heard slash play. He doesn't have a lot of technical talent, which is fine (I mean I had Richard from Rammstein on my list), but it also really doesn't sound like he has a lot of emotion in or passion in his music. It's more or less just shit that sounds 'cool.'
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#43154 - 09/22/10 05:55 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Clicks]
ta2zz Offline
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Registered: 08/28/07
Posts: 1552
Loc: Connecticut

 Originally Posted By: TV is God
Don't forget Michael Angelo Batio.

The man is nothing without his custom guitar he relies too heavily on a gimmick. I’m betting only guitarists here know his name and only because of that guitar.

Why has no one mentioned Vernon Reid?

Love rears its ugly head
This ones all well produced.

Elvis is dead
This one is a little rougher and I know the sound sucks but you can hear him mimicking the sax if you listen. That and his performance is just awesome from playing a crack head to strumming a dead guitar.

I am not a fan of older live music that gets played at a quicker tempo. Pink Floyds old songs sounded pretty spot on to the studio recordings, even without Roger Waters. I saw the Momentary Lapse of reason tour I think it was the late 80’s.

I haven’t seen that many musicians on the stage since Elvis.

The future is the master keyboardist and amazing midi controllers.

Enjoy

~T~
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#43165 - 09/23/10 10:58 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: ta2zz]
MatthewJ1
Unregistered



I am watching a Jimi hendrix DVD bootleg I bought a week ago. The bootleg runs for five hours and is filled with all these rare Hendrix performances. The picture quality is pretty crap at times, but the guitar playing is just great stuff.

I have also bought a DVD of a Cream reunion concert from 2005 at Royal Albert Hall. This is fantastic as well. All three of them look comfortable and enjoyed playing together. Clapton was controlled, yet brilliant.

I like music DVDs and bootlegs. I got a Led Zeppelin one from a 1977 Seattle show, but the picture quality was too poor to really enjoy.

Other good guitarists:

Robbie Robertson of The Band - great player

Bruce Springsteen

Steve Jones of The Sex Pistols - the man couldn't really play that well but who gives a fuck. Great stuff.

Duane Allman

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#43167 - 09/24/10 09:07 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: ta2zz]
Nyte Offline
member


Registered: 10/19/09
Posts: 380
Loc: Ohio
 Originally Posted By: ta2zz

 Originally Posted By: TV is God
Don't forget Michael Angelo Batio.

The man is nothing without his custom guitar he relies too heavily on a gimmick. I’m betting only guitarists here know his name and only because of that guitar.

Why has no one mentioned Vernon Reid?

Love rears its ugly head
This ones all well produced.

Elvis is dead
This one is a little rougher and I know the sound sucks but you can hear him mimicking the sax if you listen. That and his performance is just awesome from playing a crack head to strumming a dead guitar.

I am not a fan of older live music that gets played at a quicker tempo. Pink Floyds old songs sounded pretty spot on to the studio recordings, even without Roger Waters. I saw the Momentary Lapse of reason tour I think it was the late 80’s.

I haven’t seen that many musicians on the stage since Elvis.

The future is the master keyboardist and amazing midi controllers.

Enjoy

~T~


LOL Ta2zz, I hate the sound of just about anything done in midi format. I'm not sure if it's because it just doesn't sound like the real thing to me, or what. I know a lot of the industrial/grunge music is reproduced sounds (in studio and "pieced in" electronically) but for some reason when it's put in the midi format, it changes the way it sounds to me. It might just be my hearing, since I have exceptional hearing, that I can tell the difference. Shit, my family calls me "dog ears" because I can hear sounds that they can't. In a room with a computer on, a TV on with the x-box running and a fan running, I found a hamster that got loose because she walked across a piece of card board behind a dresser. I CAN hear a difference in sounds and sounds made into midis sound "off" to me. Oh well. Someone may enjoy that kind of replication. I'd rather hear the "real" sound cut and pasted into something digitally, or dubbed in.
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#43174 - 09/24/10 02:18 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Clicks]
Draculesti Offline
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Registered: 09/18/07
Posts: 325
Loc: Rockville, Maryland
Okay, I don't have a lot of time here, so this is a basic general reply to the thread overall. I'd like to take the time, mostly, to dispell a few myths and correct some inaccuracies.

 Quote:
I've learned that I value passion and emotion in the music more than technicality or being able to make weird sounds.


Firstly, regarding technique. There are SO many misconceptions about technique, that it's not even funny. "Technical" is a misnomer in that many use that word as an adjective to describe a "type" of music, as if to say that there is technical music, and then all the other, more "soulful" stuff. Total bullshit. Technique is NOT a style, a type, but a musical TOOL, a means to a musical end. From the simplest melody, from Pete Townsend's one note to Andres Segovia's hundreds, technique is present. Technique is not the musical devil that so many seem to think it is. True, there are many guitarists who are all technique and no soul, but all soul and no technique is no better. They ["soul" and technique] must exist in tandem, otherwise what you have is a one dimensional player.

That is all for now. More later when I have the time.
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#43176 - 09/24/10 05:40 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Nyte]
ta2zz Offline
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Registered: 08/28/07
Posts: 1552
Loc: Connecticut

Did you listen to the musician and what he does at that link, I think not? I also think you are confusing what I am speaking about with a .mid format song on your computer. Example .mid

All this talk of exceptional hearing makes me think, a compact disk is different from a record in the fact that the sound now takes steps digitally instead of gentle curves. This is the difference between digital and analog. Do you hate all digital music? What about mp3’s?

 Originally Posted By: Nyte
Oh well. Someone may enjoy that kind of replication. I'd rather hear the "real" sound cut and pasted into something digitally, or dubbed in.

Sampled music can be inserted into a live performance using a “midi” controller. MIDI being the Music Instrument Digital Interface and all.

The midi controller can be used to trigger samples of actual recorded instruments. This controller often takes the shape of a keyboard but others exist that benefit the guitarist.

Midi Guitar controler Not as elaborate as the keyboardist in my previous link.

Different controllers handle samples differently as well as different musicians.

Peace

~T~
_________________________
We are the music makers, And we are the dreamers of dreams. ~Arthur William Edgar O'Shaughnessy

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#43177 - 09/24/10 06:22 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Draculesti]
TV is God Moderator Offline
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Registered: 08/11/08
Posts: 273
Loc: The Cornhole
 Originally Posted By: Draculesti
"Technical" is a misnomer in that many use that word as an adjective to describe a "type" of music, as if to say that there is technical music, and then all the other, more "soulful" stuff. Total bullshit. Technique is NOT a style, a type, but a musical TOOL, a means to a musical end.

Couldn't agree more. To me being a more technical musician is synonymous with being a better musician and what it means to be a better musician is the ability to do with your hands what you have in your head. Whether that be "I need to do this pattern this fast" or more abstract like "I need to make this feeling" the quality of the technique is measured in how quickly and easily he can accomplish what he wants. That is assuming his standards of what is wanted aren't soul written around what he's done.
Just like Jimi Hendrix knowing the perfect note to hit, how to hit it, and whether to let it ring, bend it up or down, when to kill it. These things are all another form of technique, one that transcends just the type of instrument and the physical act of how one manipulates the strings, keys, or whatever.

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#43179 - 09/24/10 11:24 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: TV is God]
Oxus Offline
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Registered: 04/15/10
Posts: 509
Agreed also. During my study with Robert Fripp we spent some time discussing the importance of 'practice'. Which meant the development of expert technique in order to facilitate comfortably, whatever is being demanded of at the moment.

Yo can have a Coltrane vocabulary but it does you no good if you have Keith Richards' hands (I love Keith by the way, but you get my point!)

This 'development' also extended to our 'inner' awareness and our ability to Become a honed vessel through which the music can flow (trying to not sound all religious and spiritual).

I think a great example of a guitarist that has some chops but is certainly not an Alan Holdsworth, and has become such a vessel through which the Muses move through, is Carlos Santana.

Beautiful tone, awesome feeling. When you watch him play it is magickal, when he speaks you can sense something deeper going on than with most ordinary guitarists.


 Originally Posted By: TV is God
 Originally Posted By: Draculesti
"Technical" is a misnomer in that many use that word as an adjective to describe a "type" of music, as if to say that there is technical music, and then all the other, more "soulful" stuff. Total bullshit. Technique is NOT a style, a type, but a musical TOOL, a means to a musical end.

Couldn't agree more. To me being a more technical musician is synonymous with being a better musician and what it means to be a better musician is the ability to do with your hands what you have in your head. Whether that be "I need to do this pattern this fast" or more abstract like "I need to make this feeling" the quality of the technique is measured in how quickly and easily he can accomplish what he wants. That is assuming his standards of what is wanted aren't soul written around what he's done.
Just like Jimi Hendrix knowing the perfect note to hit, how to hit it, and whether to let it ring, bend it up or down, when to kill it. These things are all another form of technique, one that transcends just the type of instrument and the physical act of how one manipulates the strings, keys, or whatever.

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#43186 - 09/25/10 09:04 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: ta2zz]
Nyte Offline
member


Registered: 10/19/09
Posts: 380
Loc: Ohio
 Originally Posted By: ta2zz

Did you listen to the musician and what he does at that link, I think not? I also think you are confusing what I am speaking about with a .mid format song on your computer. Example .mid

All this talk of exceptional hearing makes me think, a compact disk is different from a record in the fact that the sound now takes steps digitally instead of gentle curves. This is the difference between digital and analog. Do you hate all digital music? What about mp3’s?

 Originally Posted By: Nyte
Oh well. Someone may enjoy that kind of replication. I'd rather hear the "real" sound cut and pasted into something digitally, or dubbed in.

Sampled music can be inserted into a live performance using a “midi” controller. MIDI being the Music Instrument Digital Interface and all.

The midi controller can be used to trigger samples of actual recorded instruments. This controller often takes the shape of a keyboard but others exist that benefit the guitarist.

Midi Guitar controler Not as elaborate as the keyboardist in my previous link.

Different controllers handle samples differently as well as different musicians.

Peace

~T~


Ta2zz, I don't know how to explain what I can hear when he's playing that organ with all the controls. It's an unnatural hum that continues between notes. I listened to the video, without watching it, to figure out what it was that "bugs" me so much about what's being played and that's the first thing that stands out when I listen to it.

I did say that I like grunge type music, which you and I both know most of is digitally created any more. There is a huge difference between vinyl and CD and the sounds you get from both. Listen to a vinyl and then play the same song from a CD. The CD will sound clean and filtered, even though the song is the same. That's simply because the programs that are used to create CD's are set up to filter out "noise". Similar types of programs are used to set up MIDI controls for things like this organ but don't take into account the noise the organ itself makes while producing the "added" music/sound. The problem is, that instead of hearing natural "background" noise from the music actually being played, you're now hearing the actual instrument sound that the MIDI is being "played through" (the hum of the organ itself).

CD's and MP3's are a music source themselves but are not insturments. You can "record" a live version of a song on a CD, put it into the MP3 format and still end up with it sounding like it did from the original source (depending on how you set up your programing for the recording and MP3) because it's not being played "through" or being produced by another instrument.

And obviously I don't hate all digital music. I just don't like the "plastic humming" that I can hear from something like this organ using the MIDI for other instruments/sounds. The guitar one sounds closer for me to what it was being used to achieve (probably because most of what it changed the sound to were string instruments anyways), but it still sounds "off". Especially the horn, organ and drum. They both have their uses, just not something I'd listen to on a regular basis by themselves. It has an irritating, "unnatural" sound to me.

BTW, I went and listened to several of the other youtube videos of the other MIDI guitars that are out there. I even watched a couple pertaining to the Roland Guitar. It's interesting how far they have come with MIDI sounds.
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#43328 - 09/29/10 03:32 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Oxus]
Draculesti Offline
Impaler
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Registered: 09/18/07
Posts: 325
Loc: Rockville, Maryland
TV, Oxus, I'm glad to see there are people who get it.

 Quote:
During my study with Robert Fripp we spent some time discussing the importance of 'practice'. Which meant the development of expert technique in order to facilitate comfortably, whatever is being demanded of at the moment.


Exactly. Technique is simply the muscular development of the playing mechanism to allow for maximum ease and comfort. Unnecessary tension can be a career killer, and so the development of technique is about reducing that tension to the absolute minimum needed for the execution of a musical passage or piece. It's also about developing reach and allowing for the fingers to work independently of one another.

 Quote:
Yo can have a Coltrane vocabulary but it does you no good if you have Keith Richards' hands .


That should be framed and hung on the wall for all to see.

There is another misconception about practice and technique, as though guys who never practice or have never studied formally (i.e. lessons of any kind) are somehow more amazing than those guitarists/musicians who have. Firstly, many of those guys who swear they don't practice or work to develop the playing style they have, are plainly and simply lying. As Yngwie Malmsteen would have everyone believe, he was apparently shat out of his mother's womb with his Stratocaster in his pudgy little baby hand and could play "Flight of the Bumblebee" within hours of birth, much like a colt that is running and frolicking within hours of being born. It just plain doesn't happen that way. Even those who are deemed prodigies must develop muscular strength, dexterity, and coordination. Prodigies have an innate musical sense and ear, but their bodies must play catch up. This is where the development of technique comes in.

Furthermore, this adulation and worship of those who "don't work for it" is a slap in the face of those who do, who live, breathe, eat, sleep, and fuck music. It's an insult to denigrate a musician who did go to music school and poured as much (if not more) blood, sweat and tears into studying music. I've heard such insults hurled at bands like Rush, who are no less amazing for having formally studied music. It's not untrue that a music education can paint you in a box, but only if you let it.
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#44777 - 12/09/10 07:31 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: ]
John Dark Offline
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Registered: 09/20/10
Posts: 6
Vernon Reid, Brian Setzer, Buddy Miller, Uli Jon Roth, and Ritchie Blackmore.
No one-liners, please. Either post something of value, or don't post. An example of a one-liner is "Yes, indeed!", which you posted immediately after this. Kindly read the FAQ, and bear in mind that one-liners will be removed.


Edited by SkaffenAmtiskaw (12/09/10 07:38 AM)

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#44806 - 12/10/10 12:22 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: John Dark]
Fist Moderator Offline
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Registered: 08/31/07
Posts: 1453
Loc: B'mo Cautious MF
Growing up, my dad, who was a Korean War vet, had a lot of friends who were Viet Nam vets. One of them was pretty much a washed up bum but he played fantastic classical 12 string Spanish guitar. He tried to teach me to play but I really don't think that part of my brain was receptive to the training.

Now, at 40, I think would like to revisit the 'ol git box. Any suggestions for picking up the craft at this stage of the game?
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#44808 - 12/10/10 02:18 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Fist]
Draculesti Offline
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Registered: 09/18/07
Posts: 325
Loc: Rockville, Maryland
While it's true that learning an instrument as an adult can be much more difficult than as a child (much like language), an astute (and patient) student, as well as an attentive and knowledgeable teacher can get some surprisingly good results. In some ways, it's actually easier to teach adults, because it is easier to explain what are already abstract musical concepts in language that is free of cumbersome metaphors and and not overly simplified, unlike with children.

I would start with thinking about what style(s) specifically you would like to learn. While basic technique is more or less universal for all styles, pinning down a specific style or styles can actually help clarify and define what direction your studies will take. I will say, however, that it is acknowledged that classical is the best and fastest way to build a solid technique.

The next step would be to seek out a good teacher. Don't be afraid to go with a teacher who is freelance, especially if his/her credentials are good. Music stores that give lessons can be good, but always ask for credentials; community music schools are generally best, but sometimes the quality of teaching can be pretty wide-ranged, from super shitty to top of the class.

Third, is to buy a decent guitar. I can't stress this point enough: you must strike a balance between quality of construction and price (if money is an object and you don't want to make too much of an investment in case it doesn't work out). Especially with classical guitars, price is, generally, directly related to quality. In other words, shitty guitars are cheap, but don't sound as good and are harder to play; good guitars are more expensive, but sound better, and are easier to play, which in my opinion makes learning the instrument easier. There are some great classicals that are of great quality for student budget prices; I recommend This Guy (specifically check out the Cremona model; it's $1,250, but it is of amazing quality and sounds better than some concert models four times its price range). I realize that's a lot of cash, so here is another great alternative: Aria Guitars. The problem is, the good high-end models are going to cost every bit as much as the LoPrinzi, although you may find some deals on ebay. You can also try finding a used vintage model. They made an AC-20 model that would be excellent for a beginning guitar, but they only made those from 1977-81. I have one that I might be willing to part with.

Finally, as far as learning material is concerned, a teacher will more than likely recommend his or her own preferences for methods. Myself, I would recommend the following materials (if classical is your choice of direction):

Either of these two methods are good:

Solo Guitar Playing, 4th Ed. by Fredrick Noad (Amsco publications) Con: a little disjointed, introducing certain concepts a bit too early, in my opinion, and certain concepts I don't agree with at all.

Learning the Classic Guitar, Vols. 1-3 by Aaron Shearer (Mel Bay publications) Con: very slow-paced with, in my opinion, some overly-simplistic material.

ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL:
Pumping Nylon by Scott Tennant (Amsco publications). It's not a method, it's a technique manual, but it is the most concise, yet complete, technique manual around.

The Art and Technique of Practice by Richard Provost (Guitar Solo publications). Also not a method, this is a book that I consider required reading. It introduces a practice methodology, a step-by-step text on how to practice (a topic that is sorely lacking coverage in a large percent of the pedagogical/didactic literature). It's only one approach, but it gets good results. It will help you clarify what your goals are in learning guitar (from the long-term down to short-term goals), and it covers topics such as scheduling, and various stages of practice, such as note-learning, interpretative practice (making the piece more musical), and problem solving (ways to identify, isolate, break down, and conquer troublesome spots).


I hope I have been able to provide some good information here. It's a lot, I know, but it should greatly help you in your decision making process.
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The Holy Trinity: Me, Myself, and I.

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#44810 - 12/10/10 04:34 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Draculesti]
John Dark Offline
stranger


Registered: 09/20/10
Posts: 6
Draculesti, you've made excellent points here. I was in the musical instrument business for a LONG time, doing everything from retail to product development & artist relations. You hit the nail right on the head.
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#44812 - 12/10/10 05:58 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: John Dark]
Dutch Satanist Offline
pledge


Registered: 10/19/10
Posts: 69
Loc: Delft, The Netherlands
I'm still missing a few.

Darrel Dimebag of Pantera,
Adrian Smith, Steve Harris and Dave Murray of Iron Maiden,
Yngwie Malmsteen (say what you like, but the guy has an incredible technique),
Jeff Waters of Annihilator,
Piggy from Voivod,
... and probably some more I could mention.

I think this list will grow quite big, since there is so much talent out there.
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#44839 - 12/11/10 11:31 AM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Draculesti]
Fist Moderator Offline
veteran member


Registered: 08/31/07
Posts: 1453
Loc: B'mo Cautious MF
Thanks Drac. By the way, perhaps you are being modest but I think you should mention to the committee that you are a Master in Music. AU I belive?

I have very broad musical tastes. While I would love to shred an axe in the style of the best talent of Metallica or Megadeth, that might be a long time coming. I wouldn't mind learning to do some acoustic stuff on a small guitar that is easy to take on a deployment. Yeah, I can see me now, 6' 230lbs doing "Over the Rainbow" on a ukulele in the West African bush.

But seriously, for starters I would probably look at doing some classic American Folk, Blues, and Country - perhaps some Mexican six string.
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I am the Devil and I am here to do the Devil's work.

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#44847 - 12/11/10 01:29 PM Re: Guitar Heroes! [Re: Fist]
Draculesti Offline
Impaler
member


Registered: 09/18/07
Posts: 325
Loc: Rockville, Maryland
 Quote:
Thanks Drac. By the way, perhaps you are being modest but I think you should mention to the committee that you are a Master in Music. AU I belive?


LOL Yes, that I am. You're close; it was actually from Peabody Conservatory that I graduated with my Master's. Peabody is right in your town, on the mean streets of B'mo. You know, in the nice part, Mount Vernon ;\)

 Quote:
I have very broad musical tastes. While I would love to shred an axe in the style of the best talent of Metallica or Megadeth, that might be a long time coming. I wouldn't mind learning to do some acoustic stuff on a small guitar that is easy to take on a deployment. Yeah, I can see me now, 6' 230lbs doing "Over the Rainbow" on a ukulele in the West African bush.


If you're looking for a small guitar, you probably can't do worse than the Martin Steel-String Backpacker. They also make a nylon string version, which I was unaware of until this very moment.

 Quote:
But seriously, for starters I would probably look at doing some classic American Folk, Blues, and Country - perhaps some Mexican six string.


By classic American folk, are you thinking more Woody Guthrie, or later? Personally, I'm partial to Jim Croce, especially This One. As far as blues goes, I'm not too familiar with a lot of blues players. Robert Johnson was one of the best, but he used a lot of slide, which is an advanced technique. I like John Lee Hooker, too, and I think his style was a little simpler than Johnson's. This appears to be a pretty good beginning course in blues guitar. As far as country goes, you can't go wrong with The Man in Black. Johnny Cash has some great songs that, to my ear anyway, don't sound to be too difficult to strum along to. I'm partial to this one: Thirteen. It was actually written for Johnny Cash by Glenn Danzig, so you already know it's awesome.
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