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#44267 - 11/20/10 09:09 AM Evola
Blasphemer Offline
lurker


Registered: 10/16/10
Posts: 4
Loc: NSW, Australia
I have studied quite a lot of Traditionalism and am interested how people see this in light of Satanism. While I find such authors as Rene Guenon and Schuon "white lighters" and of little value I am more interested in Evola. His heroic ethic and works of Tantra I find especially intrigueing. There is a great interest in his work especially from the Asatru crowd and there does seem to be a certain crossover between the LHP and Northern traditions. While some of this is the Set-Odin connection of the ToS and Rune Gild. Many other satanists seem attracted to the Runes etc as well and to Traditionalism.
Like to hear what others have to say.

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#44450 - 11/25/10 08:56 AM Re: Evola [Re: Blasphemer]
TheInsane Offline
member


Registered: 09/16/09
Posts: 356
I appreciate Evola a lot. And while I am not in agreement with everything he stands for I do find that his and my ideas do have many similarities. Now I am no expert in Evola and I have only read two of his books and a few articles but I can safely say that he was very well read and is respected a great deal in academic circles. I recommend people to read his works for sure.

In his book on Tantra we get a very in-depth study of the left hand path the way it originated and the way it is still practiced today. A very valuable source that also makes it very clear that what the LHP really is and was is something quite different than what some contemporary Satanists claim (who obviously have no idea of the basic concepts behind the practice).

The other book I have read is “Men among the ruins” which is most Evolas political book. For me I can really appreciate his thoughts on anti-egalitarianism, the organic society and basic critique of democracy and liberal ideology. It will provoke the modern man a great deal but he always supports what he says and shows his reasoning behind his ideas.

As you said, Evola is very much read and appreciated in the pagan community, especially the people who focus on the old Norse tradition, as well as in “new right” political circles. The ToS have also been very open to reading and studying Evolas works (even though I am confused with how they use his, or his reproduction of the Hindu definition of the LHP to support their own definition since they are fundamentally at odds with each other – one being dualist and the other non-dualist). I think more people should get out there and discover Evola because there is a lot of wisdom and knowledge contain within his works.

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#45625 - 12/25/10 07:43 PM Re: Evola [Re: TheInsane]
The Zebu Offline
senior member


Registered: 08/08/08
Posts: 1640
Loc: Orlando, FL
I have read primarily his esoteric works "The Hermetic Tradition" and "Introduction to Magic". Evola was the first writer to ever propose occult theory and practice that I could really resonate with. As such he is a large influence on my own personal ideas and praxis.

Of his political and social works, I have only read snippets, but I hope to read his more prominent books in full whenever I have the chance to get my hands on them. His occasional support for fascism doesn't really put me off, although some of his ideas on racial dynamics strike me as somewhat oddballish. But like TheInsane pointed out, he's well-read and backs up his arguments in a concise manner.

Tantra is still something I have only a minimal amount of knowledge about, so when I have studied the source texts I will probably be able to judge the western expositions better.
_________________________
«Recibe, ¡oh Lucifer! la sangre de esta víctima que sacrifico en tu honor.»

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#45633 - 12/26/10 06:48 AM Re: Evola [Re: The Zebu]
TheInsane Offline
member


Registered: 09/16/09
Posts: 356
Well, he did support fascism as something he saw was the best thing to lead to what he (Evola) wanted. He saw it more as a tool rather than an end in itself.

His racism isnt what we would call racism today. he spoke of spiritual races and thus he didnt stick to the biological racism of national socialism for example. The very lengthy introduction to one edition of "men among the ruins" gives a great insight into this and it is highly recomended.

His work on Tantra is very detailed and can be a hard read because of that but it is a invaluable source if you want to understand that tradition. And as Satanists its very interesting since he puts alot of focus on the LHP and its original roots.

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#45733 - 12/28/10 10:29 AM Re: Evola [Re: TheInsane]
thedeadidea Offline
member


Registered: 08/15/10
Posts: 209
Julius Evola men amongst the ruin is a classic, his insight into eastern philosophy, hermetics and hermeneutics are all useful informative and insightful reads. His transcendentalism is a little to my distaste but without a doubt one of the unsung greats of western esoteric/occult philosophy.
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#48640 - 02/11/11 09:43 AM Re: Evola [Re: Blasphemer]
Gattamelata Offline
stranger


Registered: 03/23/10
Posts: 44
We will fiercely combat all intellectual and philosophic rhetoric whereby man restrains himself to talk about his impotency (which we mean when speaking of "truth", "objectivity", "rationality", etc.) rather than to finally jump to his feet, to grasp himself and, burning up his impotency, to make himself what he is in himself: a God, a builder of the world.
-Julius Evola-

I appreciate Evola. Of the so-called ’Traditionalists’ he represents the man of action instead of the priestly escapism so often visible in the ranks of Guenon et al; espousing as he does a doctrine of personal liberation that equates the Absolute Man with the principle of the Absolute Divine: founded on the overarching objective of breeding a new race of superior beings – a new elite that will function as the pinnacle of society – in flesh and not as a mere theological abstract or as myth.

This concern with the initiation of an elite is Evola’s driving motive, making him appear somewhat inhuman and cold to those still concerned with the masses of humanity: i.e the majority of humans. These people Evola regarded not as humans, but as degenerate beasts of burden, suffering the destiny of being entrapped and dominated by the forces of Life instead of being able to master and transcend them. Evola believed that in a true society, the herds of humanity would be subjugated to a hierarchy that utilized and expanded upon the potential of man rather than diminishing it.

And it is the mastery of these forces of Life that is the prime concern of Evola. He developed a philosophical framework (’magical idealism’) and outlined different occult paths and methods that could be followed to realize this framework. Of these methods we find as diverse techniques as old school buddhist ascetism as well as the sinister cult and practices of the Left-Handed tantra.

Evola’s support for various political systems, ideologies and external religious forms (”myths” as he call them) are always a practical matter, where he attempts to guide these forms so as they become receptive to and subjugated to his own occult visions, whether such forms are in the guise of Italian fascism, medieval monarchism, national socialism or even certain artistic and cultural movements of modernity.

As for the relation between Evola and Satanism one would have to define what kind of Satanism one is comparing it to. That a whole bunch of evolian concepts may appear alluring to the Satanist is understandable: the initiation of an elite; the manipulation and ordering of society and history through myth and ritual; personal liberation through harsh alchemical experiences; an unrelenting non-theist ontology et cetera.
_________________________
Society : an inferno of saviors. —Emil Cioran

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#48647 - 02/11/11 10:25 AM Re: Evola [Re: Gattamelata]
Gueheriet Offline
stranger


Registered: 12/11/09
Posts: 23
I see "Ride the Tiger" as his most "satanic" work, the man he describes( the aristocrat of the soul), and his relationship with modern society are, for me, one of the most acurate descriptions of what I understand as a satanist.
I would like to have a deeper conversation about him and his works, but I´d say my english skills are not good enough to make it enterntaining.

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#48673 - 02/11/11 12:50 PM Re: Evola [Re: Gueheriet]
Blasphemer Offline
lurker


Registered: 10/16/10
Posts: 4
Loc: NSW, Australia
I recently read the Cinnabar Way (http://www.arktos.com) which is Evola's own introduction to his works. It explains how his ideas developed and the changes his work went through as he matured. It is a fascinating work. Evola's model of the absolute individual to me is very similiar to the ideal of becoming a discrete, isolate intelligience which transcends death and hence has similarities with various LHP traditions.
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