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#56344 - 06/29/11 10:58 PM All the Kings Men and Citizen Kane - a Review
MatthewJ1
Unregistered



This is a rather large written review of two great Satanic movies.

The first movie is called All the Kings Men and the second is Citizen Kane. Both of these films are on the Church of Satan’s recommended viewing list for Satanic films.

All the Kings Men came out in 1949 and won three Academy awards including Best Picture, Best Actor and Best Supporting Actress. It was roughly based on the life of former Louisiana governor Huey Long. This is one of the more powerful films I have seen.

I don’t think Citizen Kane needs much introduction. I think most people are aware of it. I will just say that it was made by Welles and came out in 1941. It was roughly based on the life of Hearst and has been regarded by a few critics over the years as the finest American film ever made.

I find the main characters of these two films, Willie Stark, of All the Kings Men and Charles Foster Kane, of Citizen Kane to be two of the more powerful I have seen put forward on the screen. There are differences in the biography of these two characters, but there are also a number of interesting similarities.

Kane’s psychology is rather fascinating. Kane is born into an ordinary, coarse and simple life, and this life and the way he lives it contains his earliest experiences and hence has a deep influence on his character and the way he responds to his experience as an adult.

He is forced to leave this ordinary life behind (and it is henceforth relegated to memory and condemned to be idealised and represented by objects, such as Rosebud) by his mothers good fortune. He is then exposed to the so called better things in life, such as the best education, the best living locations and the myriad advantages of someone who comes into a great private fortune.

This second and somewhat alien form of life causes Kane to regard himself as two different people within one: that is, as a privileged, cultured and rich gentleman, on the one hand, and as an ordinary and simple person, with a supposed affinity with other simple and ordinary hard working people, on the other hand. This psychology of two different people in one tends to play out through rebellion at times, particularly in his youth and a desire to represent.

Thatcher, who Kane seems to blame for the loss of his once perfect and authentic life as a child, is the hand which feeds Kane and who represents the forces of privilege and wealth and is a distant, calculating and cold figure. Kane grows to hate Thatcher and as a result the forces Thatcher represents. This hatred fuels Kane’s desire to see himself as a man with position and power, who helps the ordinary working man and defeats Thatcher the enemy and the forces he represents, and hence regain his ordinariness, his simple and plain greatness beneath the show of wealth and privilege.

Stark’s experience is somewhat different from Kane’s. Stark shares the same ordinary, coarse and simple life, but he does not escape it except by his own hard work and persistence. Stark starts out on his road to power as a mild and well meaning troublemaker, a stirrer who wants to put an end to the monopoly of the old powers of the local elite and who wishes to see the state reformed and progress installed. Stark runs for local office, but fails. He disappears from sight, but demonstrates his desire to be somebody by studying law, at night, at home, and succeeding and opening his own practice.

Stark runs as a political candidate again, this time for Governor, but he is judged to be inept and naïve by the elites, who are using him to gain their own advantage and to watch him lose. Stark finds out how he is being played for a rube. He makes a choice to pose as an outspoken, loud and blunt enemy of elitism and appeals to the masses by telling them what they most want to hear, and by identifying himself and his experience with the identity and experience of the “hicks.”

Stark and Kane both appear to sincerely believe in higher principles and state that they will act in conformity with those principles. Kane, himself, goes to the trouble of writing down and publishing his principles in his newspaper for the public to read and hold him to. Stark, as a candidate for political office and a crusading lawyer, seems constantly concerned with the sorts of principles, which benefit the majority and the disadvantaged or exposed, and with communicating his apparently good intentions and his commitment to defend those principles and bring down corruption and the old order.

Both Stark and Kane gain considerable power through their pitch to the majority. Stark constantly identifies his purpose or his self - interest so closely with the greater public interest that there is seemingly no distinction between them. Kane, likewise, tries to ensure that his papers reflect the popular current and he takes a liberal working class line at all times, or so it seems, at least in the beginning.

The so called good intentions begin to unravel rather quickly and one begins to wonder whether these so called good intentions existed at all, or were just a Lesser Magical tactic, a part of a long term game. It is tempting to see both Kane and Stark corrupted, or at least seduced, by the very elite forces which they say they are determined to bring down. Stark appears to just replace the corrupt elite with himself and turn his elite predecessors into employees, while Kane is harder to pin down. His “corrupters” if they exist, are off screen in the shadows, or are pulling the strings somewhere else.

A very different perception of these two men certainly appears as the films progress and one sees the two men in private and behind the public facade. They have a number of things in common. Both Kane and Stark are completely self – centred and regard their endgame as so important that an alternative to their endgame, their will, is almost unthinkable or is regarded as irrational or unlawful.

The means which they employ to achieve their endgame and the socially imposed ethical or moral questions or objections raised by their actions seem almost irrelevant, or are brushed aside by the two men. The only criteria for choosing a means seems to be the means efficiency, its utility and whether accountability can be claimed or disclaimed successfully as necessary.

Each man possesses almost unlimited iron will, an over abundance of energy and endless persistence. The image of Stark, standing on the floor of the state legislature, demanding and insisting that his program be put through is a striking example. Kane’s angry retort to Emily that people will think what he tells them to think is typical as well. Both men gain and exercise enormous power – Kane, for instance, controls and shapes the thinking and destiny of millions of people through his vast media empire.

Stark turns everybody into an employee and he has them working towards the goal that he has in mind. There is no doubt that Stark’s methods seem to work. He directs the rebuilding of the entire state and it is all done in his name. There are hospitals, schools, roads, utilities etc. Stark is impatient, obsessed with his own vision and he demands loyalty and that everybody do exactly what he tells them to do or else. Kane demands the same sort of loyalty and exercises the same sort of control over nearly everybody he comes into contact with. The only one who Kane cannot control is Geddes, who is far too powerful for such control.

The vision these two men have is extraordinary and the relentless pursuit of that vision and the positive and negative consequences are what turn them into powerhouses and guarantee their place in history.

Kane’s final fate differs from Stark’s. Kane slowly withdraws from society after the Great Depression and builds Xanadu; a never completed total environment of enormous proportions, and he fills it with cold, beautiful and silent artificial human companions which he can move around, or leave alone and in boxes or wooden cages, as if they were pieces on a chessboard and he were the lone player - a player who seems to have lost the ability to control and influence real human beings on a mass scale as he once did; or a dark magician who has retired/disappeared and designed a ritual space with beautiful pale mannequins, which he moves in an idealised and abstract game, mirroring his great concrete creations and manipulation in the real outside world of flesh and blood and soil.

The only anomaly in Kane’s frozen world of marble, silent witnesses and all his other objects is Susan. I like the image of her sitting before the enormous fireplace, doing her jigsaw puzzles, while Kane questions and regards her from afar, within that enormous room. She is impatient, bored, practical and young. She is oriented towards action and interaction in the outside world, while Kane contemplates his fading power and remains locked up inside his environment, his cell, and attempts to control and remake Susan the way he would control any of his objects, either flesh or marble. It is inevitable that they divorce as she will only take it for so long before she snaps. Kane and his power to control slowly crumbles and fades away.

Stark’s fate is assassination, his own very public death at the hands of a representative of outraged conscience, or the ethical man pushed just too far. Stark is determined to control every human being he comes into contact with and to damage or destroy any enemy who attempts to damage his self – interest or his reputation and refuses to back down and compromise.

He reminds me of Hoover in some ways. Stark keeps notes on people, he finds out all the dirty little secrets which people like to keep hidden and then uses the information to control people and gain favours. Stark’s dark fate is sealed when he is compelled to attack and destroy The Judge when The Judge threatens his reputation and interests.

The Judge is seemingly incorruptible, but Stark with his superior understanding of the fallibility of carnal human nature, is convinced that The Judge has sinned in some way and hence is susceptible to control and manipulation. Stark’s weak point, however, is his belief that The Judge will attempt to negotiate, or allow himself to be controlled, in order to save his own skin if such sins can be found.

The Judge has sinned, and Stark’s employees, who love The Judge and are his family; but are owned by Stark, find out The Judge’s sins and tell Stark. The Judge ends up committing suicide out of guilt for what he has done and thus avoids the humiliation of becoming a puppet of Stark’s . Stark seems to win: his enemy is dead and the threat to his interests and his reputation are averted or defeated.

But The Doctor, who is himself an ethical representative and further A Healer, and who loves The Judge and has seen through Stark from the start and who has more or less allowed himself to become controlled by Stark, shoots and kills Stark because of what Stark has done to The Judge and what Stark represents.

The final message of this part of the film appears to be that one has to adopt the mindset of Stark and be prepared to go all the way, in order to defeat someone like Stark and the forces he represents. As a result, however, one will therefore be seen as having lost the commonly accepted ethical standards of a human being, and possibly life itself, or freedom, as a result.

If you are new to LHP thinking and experience than I would recommend these two films to you.

Cheers

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#56347 - 06/30/11 01:17 AM Re: All the Kings Men and Citizen Kane - a Review [Re: ]
Michael A.Aquino Offline
stalker


Registered: 09/28/08
Posts: 2599
Loc: San Francisco, CA, USA
 Originally Posted By: MatthewJ1
... Kane slowly withdraws from society after the Great Depression and builds Xanadu; a never completed total environment of enormous proportions, and he fills it with cold, beautiful and silent artificial human companions which he can move around, or leave alone and in boxes or wooden cages, as if they were pieces on a chessboard and he were the lone player - a player who seems to have lost the ability to control and influence real human beings on a mass scale as he once did; or a dark magician who has retired/disappeared and designed a ritual space with beautiful pale mannequins, which he moves in an idealised and abstract game, mirroring his great concrete creations and manipulation in the real outside world of flesh and blood and soil.

The only anomaly in Kane’s frozen world of marble, silent witnesses and all his other objects is Susan. I like the image of her sitting before the enormous fireplace, doing her jigsaw puzzles, while Kane questions and regards her from afar, within that enormous room. She is impatient, bored, practical and young. She is oriented towards action and interaction in the outside world, while Kane contemplates his fading power and remains locked up inside his environment, his cell, and attempts to control and remake Susan the way he would control any of his objects, either flesh or marble. It is inevitable that they divorce as she will only take it for so long before she snaps. Kane and his power to control slowly crumbles and fades away.

There is of course a classic debate about Citizen Kane being a caricature of William R. Hearst, and you can have some fun Googling the controversy.

As for "Xanadu", if you have the opportunity to drive California #1 between San Luis Obispo and Big Sur, take the time to tour Hearst Castle at San Simeon. Again you can do this somewhat vicariously on the Internet: websites, YouTube, etc.

As an aside, the indoor "Roman Pool" at HC is one of the most malignant locations I have ever visited, and I can't explain the sensation except to say that I could not remain there more than a few moments. Other visitors didn't seem to react that way, and the pool has no "haunted" reputation of which I'm aware. Very curious.

I suppose the obvious question, considering Anton LaVey and his 6114 world of "artificial companion" mannikins in the Den of Iniquity, is how focused on Hearst he might have been. There I draw a blank, because I don't recall the topic ever coming up in our conversations.

And when you're looking for a frisky film to watch, try The Cat's Meow.
_________________________
Michael A. Aquino

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#56349 - 06/30/11 02:54 AM Re: All the Kings Men and Citizen Kane - a Review [Re: Michael A.Aquino]
MatthewJ1
Unregistered



That is an interesting question: whether Dr. LaVey was focused on Hearst or Citizen Kane when he was thinking through the issues related to artificial human companions and total environments. I can’t recall LaVey talking about Citizen Kane anywhere in any of his interviews I have seen and in any of the books I have read about LaVey.

I thought the whole artificial human companion angle was an interesting way to read the movie, particularly Kane’s later years at Xanadu and Kane’s mania for collecting statues in general, which began quite early in his adult life - roughly at the time he travelled to Europe and came back engaged to Emily Monroe-Norton.

The story about your experience at the indoor Roman pool is an interesting one Dr.
I wonder if your experience had to do with infamous haunted angles or other formal configurations, or maybe the size of the space or something else. I am sometime conscious of the way people seem to leave strange traces of themselves behind by the way they plan their spaces and by the sorts of objects they place there within, or else create conditions for horrifying or bizarre confrontations to take place long after they have gone.

I would like to see Hearst Castle as I am interested in Hearst and in fact most of the great American Capitalist’s, particularly Carnegie, Rockefeller, Morgan and Ford. There is an aesthetic angle for me, as well as a biography with a formula for success with those guys.

My partner and I are now busy saving for a trip to the United States next year. This will be a shorter trip unfortunately, but we wish to visit New York and the west coast and hopefully the south if we can get the time. We did not get to Wewelsburg recently, but maybe Hearst Castle will be a part of the itinerary.

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#56364 - 06/30/11 12:37 PM Re: All the Kings Men and Citizen Kane - a Review [Re: ]
Michael A.Aquino Offline
stalker


Registered: 09/28/08
Posts: 2599
Loc: San Francisco, CA, USA
 Originally Posted By: MatthewJ1
My partner and I are now busy saving for a trip to the United States next year. This will be a shorter trip unfortunately, but we wish to visit New York and the west coast and hopefully the south if we can get the time. We did not get to Wewelsburg recently, but maybe Hearst Castle will be a part of the itinerary.

If you drive to HC by way of San Luis Obispo, you'll of course want to stay a night at the Madonna Inn, where if you can't find a room to your taste [click on the "Room Features Grid"], you're definitely hard to please. [Lilith and I are partial to the "Caveman".] ;\)

At the upper end of the SLO-Big Sur stretch of California #1, stop for an ambrosia burger at Nepenthe, which is about as close as the USA gets to the Grey Havens.

Indeed, do all this scientifically: Pick up a copy of this and just work your way through the state. We'll make sure you get back to Australia with your brain properly rearranged ...
_________________________
Michael A. Aquino

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#56365 - 06/30/11 12:51 PM Re: All the Kings Men and Citizen Kane - a Review [Re: Michael A.Aquino]
Jake999 Offline
senior member


Registered: 11/02/08
Posts: 2230
 Originally Posted By: Michael A.Aquino

Lilith and I are partial to the "Caveman".


It's a little disconcerting to think that you and I have been naked in the same bed. Luckily your lady Lilith and my lady Janet mitigate the circumstances. \:\)
_________________________
Bury your dead, pick up your weapon and soldier on.


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#56374 - 06/30/11 03:44 PM Re: All the Kings Men and Citizen Kane - a Review [Re: Jake999]
Michael A.Aquino Offline
stalker


Registered: 09/28/08
Posts: 2599
Loc: San Francisco, CA, USA
 Originally Posted By: Jake999
 Originally Posted By: Michael A.Aquino
Lilith and I are partial to the "Caveman".

It's a little disconcerting to think that you and I have been naked in the same bed. Luckily your lady Lilith and my lady Janet mitigate the circumstances. \:\)

Nice bouncy mattress, wasn't it?

When we were living in St. Louis while I was on active duty in the Army, we would occasionally spend a night at the Cheshire, which was all set up for, you know, me-Tarzan-you-Jane & etc.. However from its website it looks as though the suites have recently been refurnished somewhat less maniacally.

Is this a great country or what?
_________________________
Michael A. Aquino

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#56376 - 06/30/11 04:14 PM Re: All the Kings Men and Citizen Kane - a Review [Re: Michael A.Aquino]
Jake999 Offline
senior member


Registered: 11/02/08
Posts: 2230
I know the Cheshire Inn well. It was a favored destination for prom couples back in the late 60s because of the good, but affordable restaurant and that they were less than restrictive on the age of couples they would rent rooms too. And being from E. St. Louis, that part of St, Louis was about as close to Shangri-la as we could hope to find.
_________________________
Bury your dead, pick up your weapon and soldier on.


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#56412 - 07/01/11 12:06 PM Re: All the Kings Men and Citizen Kane - a Review [Re: Michael A.Aquino]
Jake999 Offline
senior member


Registered: 11/02/08
Posts: 2230
 Originally Posted By: Michael A.Aquino

Nice bouncy mattress, wasn't it?


I was talking with a friend about the coincidence of you and I being naked in the bed of The Caveman room and told him that to avoid therapy, I was going to convince myself that I had slept on Lilith's portion of the bed. He told me that wouldn't work, because it would make me "ground zero," and afterall... "you sleep on your stomach, Jake."

I have my appointment with the analyst Tuesday afternoons until 2075.
_________________________
Bury your dead, pick up your weapon and soldier on.


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#56419 - 07/01/11 03:25 PM Re: All the Kings Men and Citizen Kane - a Review [Re: Jake999]
Michael A.Aquino Offline
stalker


Registered: 09/28/08
Posts: 2599
Loc: San Francisco, CA, USA
Yabba Dabba Doo!
_________________________
Michael A. Aquino

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#56420 - 07/01/11 03:33 PM Re: All the Kings Men and Citizen Kane - a Review [Re: Michael A.Aquino]
Oxus Offline
member


Registered: 04/15/10
Posts: 513
These recent posts are the very reason Why I stay here . . .
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